Purpose. Previous research has documented that job crafting is positively associated to work engagement (Vogt, Hakanen, Brauchli, Jenny, & Bauer, 2016) and that such a behavior is volitional (Bipp & Demerouti, 2015). Based on these premises, this study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of an intervention to translate intentions to engage in job crafting into actual behavior, in order to indirectly sustain work engagement. Design/Methodology/Approach/Intervention. This is a quasi-experimental study involving nonrandom assignment to an intervention and a control group, -pre -post, and diary measures. Participants in the intervention group received a training focused on self-monitoring, planning, and goal setting techniques. Results. Results from a cross-domain growth model integrated with a path analysis showed that participants in the intervention group (N=55) reported a significant positive covariation between the initial level of behavioral intention and changes in subsequent behaviors. A series of repeated measures ANOVA showed that participation in the intervention was associated with higher levels of work engagement. Limitations. Collected measures were all self-reported. Research/Practical Implications. Results suggest that the intervention was effective in sustaining implementation processes to engage in job crafting strategies. Also, findings suggest that participation in the intervention was associated with higher work engagement, both across time and compared to the control group. Originality/Value. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on whether and how an intervention focusing on implementation strategies referred to job crafting is effective to sustain both job crafting behaviors and work engagement.

Intervention and communication processes to translate research into well-being at work. Evidence and experiences from research and practice.

Arianna Costantini
;
Evangelia Demerouti;Andrea Ceschi;Riccardo Sartori
2019

Abstract

Purpose. Previous research has documented that job crafting is positively associated to work engagement (Vogt, Hakanen, Brauchli, Jenny, & Bauer, 2016) and that such a behavior is volitional (Bipp & Demerouti, 2015). Based on these premises, this study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of an intervention to translate intentions to engage in job crafting into actual behavior, in order to indirectly sustain work engagement. Design/Methodology/Approach/Intervention. This is a quasi-experimental study involving nonrandom assignment to an intervention and a control group, -pre -post, and diary measures. Participants in the intervention group received a training focused on self-monitoring, planning, and goal setting techniques. Results. Results from a cross-domain growth model integrated with a path analysis showed that participants in the intervention group (N=55) reported a significant positive covariation between the initial level of behavioral intention and changes in subsequent behaviors. A series of repeated measures ANOVA showed that participation in the intervention was associated with higher levels of work engagement. Limitations. Collected measures were all self-reported. Research/Practical Implications. Results suggest that the intervention was effective in sustaining implementation processes to engage in job crafting strategies. Also, findings suggest that participation in the intervention was associated with higher work engagement, both across time and compared to the control group. Originality/Value. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on whether and how an intervention focusing on implementation strategies referred to job crafting is effective to sustain both job crafting behaviors and work engagement.
Work engagement, Job Crafting, Job Crafting Intervention, Well-being at Work
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/995787
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