Being a teacher means not only to perform specific teaching tasks. Current school context characteristics require capabilities to handle different situations and relationships. Hence, communication and flow of information among involved informants become prior and worthy of attention. Integrated information of students’ parents and colleagues could facilitate teachers’ work. Existing research has found that parents-teachers active communication is a fundamental component to a child’s quality education [1], [2]. Up to date literature already recognized the importance of communication among teachers and children’s parents, but little has been done in relation with colleagues’ communication. This study aimed to explore the relationship between teachers’ communication with parents, teachers’ communication with colleagues and teachers' perceived general self-efficacy [3], [4]. Several researches showed positive effects of self-efficacy such as teacher’s well-being, good professional practices, and positive students’ outcomes [5]. Our focus was to analyze teachers effectiveness in dealing with complex situations. Participants: 562 teachers working in North-East Italy primary school, lower secondary school and upper secondary school. They completed an on-line questionnaire using a 7-point Likert scale including: i) measures related to how teachers perceived their students’ parents: features of the shared language between parents and teachers, relationship/collaboration, and two dimensions of mind's state perception [6]; ii) measures related to relationship among teachers: self-efficacy in verbal communication, trust and respect. Data were analyzed with SPSS.18 using descriptive and inferential statistics. The analysis of the data indicated that teachers communicated easily with parents (Average = 5.28; SD = 1.36), they established a good relationship with them (Average = 5.07; SD = 1.25) and they attributed Agency (Average = 4.38; SD = 1.05) and Experience (Average = 4.33; SD = 1.13) equally. Teachers’ level of self-efficacy in communication with colleagues was high (Average = 5.41; SD = 0.69); they share goals and interventions (Average = 5.91; SD = 1.00) and they have high level of confidence in their colleagues (Average = 5.30; SD = 1.17). General self-efficacy correlated positively with self-efficacy in communication with colleagues (r = ,580, p < .001), ability to establish a good relationship with parents (r = .360, p < .001), Agency (r = .280, p < .001) and Experience attribution to children's parents (r = .157, p < .005), perceived respect (r = .390, p <.001) and trust in colleagues (r = .365, p < .001). Our findings are aligned with literature: a good communication between teachers and children's parents as also trust among teachers increase teachers' perceived general self-efficacy.

The Key Role of Parents-Teachers Relationship and its Effects on Teachers’ Self-Efficacy

PEDRAZZA, Monica;BERLANDA, Sabrina;Motteran, Arianna
2015-01-01

Abstract

Being a teacher means not only to perform specific teaching tasks. Current school context characteristics require capabilities to handle different situations and relationships. Hence, communication and flow of information among involved informants become prior and worthy of attention. Integrated information of students’ parents and colleagues could facilitate teachers’ work. Existing research has found that parents-teachers active communication is a fundamental component to a child’s quality education [1], [2]. Up to date literature already recognized the importance of communication among teachers and children’s parents, but little has been done in relation with colleagues’ communication. This study aimed to explore the relationship between teachers’ communication with parents, teachers’ communication with colleagues and teachers' perceived general self-efficacy [3], [4]. Several researches showed positive effects of self-efficacy such as teacher’s well-being, good professional practices, and positive students’ outcomes [5]. Our focus was to analyze teachers effectiveness in dealing with complex situations. Participants: 562 teachers working in North-East Italy primary school, lower secondary school and upper secondary school. They completed an on-line questionnaire using a 7-point Likert scale including: i) measures related to how teachers perceived their students’ parents: features of the shared language between parents and teachers, relationship/collaboration, and two dimensions of mind's state perception [6]; ii) measures related to relationship among teachers: self-efficacy in verbal communication, trust and respect. Data were analyzed with SPSS.18 using descriptive and inferential statistics. The analysis of the data indicated that teachers communicated easily with parents (Average = 5.28; SD = 1.36), they established a good relationship with them (Average = 5.07; SD = 1.25) and they attributed Agency (Average = 4.38; SD = 1.05) and Experience (Average = 4.33; SD = 1.13) equally. Teachers’ level of self-efficacy in communication with colleagues was high (Average = 5.41; SD = 0.69); they share goals and interventions (Average = 5.91; SD = 1.00) and they have high level of confidence in their colleagues (Average = 5.30; SD = 1.17). General self-efficacy correlated positively with self-efficacy in communication with colleagues (r = ,580, p < .001), ability to establish a good relationship with parents (r = .360, p < .001), Agency (r = .280, p < .001) and Experience attribution to children's parents (r = .157, p < .005), perceived respect (r = .390, p <.001) and trust in colleagues (r = .365, p < .001). Our findings are aligned with literature: a good communication between teachers and children's parents as also trust among teachers increase teachers' perceived general self-efficacy.
978-88-6292-600-3
Parents-Teachers Relationship; Relationship among Teachers; Teachers’ general self-efficacy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/926978
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