As a consequence of the exposure to potentially traumatic events, firefighters are at high risk to develop traumatic stress reactions (Wagner et al., 2010) and psychosomatic effects, such as emotional strain and feelings of hyper-arousal (Beaton & Murphy, 1993). But, as demonstrated by the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R; Bakker et al., 2003; Demerouti et al., 2001), every occupation has both job demands and job resources, that reduce job demands and the related costs. In this view, in addition to job demands and their associated negative effects, firefighters have also psychological resources at their disposal. An example is represented by mindfulness, that is the ability to pay attention to and to be aware of the current experience (Brown & Ryan, 2003; Kabat-Zinn, 1990). It has been widely demonstrated that mindfulness may influence levels of physic-physical well-being (Kabat-Zinn, 1990; Shapiro et al., 1998). This study aims to test a new process underlying the negative relationship between mindfulness and psychosomatic malaise. In particular, we proposed that intrusion predicts symptoms of general dysphoria in response to mindfulness. The sample consisted of 255 Italian firefighters (both professional and volunteer). Self-report measures were used to assess mindfulness (MAAS; Brown & Ryan, 2003), psychosomatic symptoms (GHQ-12; Goldberg & Williams, 1988) and post-traumatic manifestations (STSS-It; Setti & Argentero, 2012). Data were analyzed using structural equation modelling. Mindfulness did not directly influence general dysphoria whereas mediation analyses revealed its meaningful indirect effect via intrusion (standardized indirect effect = -.041**). According to our results, mindfulness leads to reduced symptoms of general dysphoria through low levels of intrusive thoughts. From a theoretical perspective, to our knowledge this is one of the first studies focused on the protective role of mindfulness against the risk of developing psychosomatic malaise via post-traumatic manifestations. From a practical point of view, our results suggest the importance to implement interventions based on the reduction of post-traumatic symptoms, on the one hand, and on the enhancement of mindfulness, on the other hand. Through these strategies, people could learn to regulate distressing thoughts and feelings that occur in response to stressful events.

Mindfulness and psychosomatic well-being among firefighters: a mediational model

PICCOLI, BEATRICE;BELLOTTO, Massimo
2014-01-01

Abstract

As a consequence of the exposure to potentially traumatic events, firefighters are at high risk to develop traumatic stress reactions (Wagner et al., 2010) and psychosomatic effects, such as emotional strain and feelings of hyper-arousal (Beaton & Murphy, 1993). But, as demonstrated by the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R; Bakker et al., 2003; Demerouti et al., 2001), every occupation has both job demands and job resources, that reduce job demands and the related costs. In this view, in addition to job demands and their associated negative effects, firefighters have also psychological resources at their disposal. An example is represented by mindfulness, that is the ability to pay attention to and to be aware of the current experience (Brown & Ryan, 2003; Kabat-Zinn, 1990). It has been widely demonstrated that mindfulness may influence levels of physic-physical well-being (Kabat-Zinn, 1990; Shapiro et al., 1998). This study aims to test a new process underlying the negative relationship between mindfulness and psychosomatic malaise. In particular, we proposed that intrusion predicts symptoms of general dysphoria in response to mindfulness. The sample consisted of 255 Italian firefighters (both professional and volunteer). Self-report measures were used to assess mindfulness (MAAS; Brown & Ryan, 2003), psychosomatic symptoms (GHQ-12; Goldberg & Williams, 1988) and post-traumatic manifestations (STSS-It; Setti & Argentero, 2012). Data were analyzed using structural equation modelling. Mindfulness did not directly influence general dysphoria whereas mediation analyses revealed its meaningful indirect effect via intrusion (standardized indirect effect = -.041**). According to our results, mindfulness leads to reduced symptoms of general dysphoria through low levels of intrusive thoughts. From a theoretical perspective, to our knowledge this is one of the first studies focused on the protective role of mindfulness against the risk of developing psychosomatic malaise via post-traumatic manifestations. From a practical point of view, our results suggest the importance to implement interventions based on the reduction of post-traumatic symptoms, on the one hand, and on the enhancement of mindfulness, on the other hand. Through these strategies, people could learn to regulate distressing thoughts and feelings that occur in response to stressful events.
mindfulness; psychosomatic well-being; intrusion; firefighters
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/818566
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