Every culture has its own lexicon of emotions, which allows feelings to be socially shared. According to Damasio’s studies (2003), emotions (which shape our daily experiences) might be defined as a special type of perception which informs us about current body status and any modifications due to interactions with the external environment.We believe that it would be very interesting to ascertain if there are any adjectives, belonging to the general lexicon of emotions, that consumers can use to describe emotions associated with wine and wine tasting experiences.A generic list of 453 emotional adjectives, extracted from past research was submitted to 4 experts of lexicon in the emotions. They then selected those adjectives with a relevant affective connotation to be used when consuming products. Subsequently, 92 participants judged the 141 selected adjectives to determine their suitability (dichotomic choice) to describe wine and wine tasting experiences. The 23 most popular adjectives were them presented to 278 wine consumers with the aim of determining their suitability (5 point Likert scale). A series of factorial analyses was then used to further reduce the list to 16 adjectives.Our data showed that people preferred positive as opposed to negative adjectives to describe wine and wine tasting experiences. This is in line with other studies on food consumption (King, Meiselman, 2010) and is an interesting result taking into consideration the large number of potential terms in lexicon to describe unpleasant emotions.The 16 adjectives selected could potentially be used to build wine profiles with an emotional connotation for different types of wine, also coming from various geographical areas. These profiles could be then be correlated with sensory and chemical data.

How do consumers describe the emotions, which wine elicits?

MENEGHINI, Anna Maria;FERRARINI, Roberto;CARBOGNIN, Cristina;NENCINI, Alessio
2010

Abstract

Every culture has its own lexicon of emotions, which allows feelings to be socially shared. According to Damasio’s studies (2003), emotions (which shape our daily experiences) might be defined as a special type of perception which informs us about current body status and any modifications due to interactions with the external environment.We believe that it would be very interesting to ascertain if there are any adjectives, belonging to the general lexicon of emotions, that consumers can use to describe emotions associated with wine and wine tasting experiences.A generic list of 453 emotional adjectives, extracted from past research was submitted to 4 experts of lexicon in the emotions. They then selected those adjectives with a relevant affective connotation to be used when consuming products. Subsequently, 92 participants judged the 141 selected adjectives to determine their suitability (dichotomic choice) to describe wine and wine tasting experiences. The 23 most popular adjectives were them presented to 278 wine consumers with the aim of determining their suitability (5 point Likert scale). A series of factorial analyses was then used to further reduce the list to 16 adjectives.Our data showed that people preferred positive as opposed to negative adjectives to describe wine and wine tasting experiences. This is in line with other studies on food consumption (King, Meiselman, 2010) and is an interesting result taking into consideration the large number of potential terms in lexicon to describe unpleasant emotions.The 16 adjectives selected could potentially be used to build wine profiles with an emotional connotation for different types of wine, also coming from various geographical areas. These profiles could be then be correlated with sensory and chemical data.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/627160
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