Extreme teams, large-scale agent teams operating in dynamic environments, are on the horizon. Such environments are problematic for current task allocation algorithms due to the lack of locality in agent interactions. We propose a novel distributed task allocation algorithm for extreme teams, called LA-DCOP, that incorporates three key ideas. First, LA-DCOP's task allocation is based on a dynamically computed minimum capability threshold which uses approximate knowledge of overall task load. Second, LA-DCOP uses tokens to represent tasks and further minimize communication. Third, it creates potential tokens to deal with inter-task constraints of simultaneous execution. We show that LA-DCOP convincingly outperforms competing distributed task allocation algorithms while using orders of magnitude fewer messages, allowing a dramatic scale-up in extreme teams, upto a fully distributed, proxybased team of 200 agents. Varying threshold are seen as a key to outperforming competing distributed algorithms in the domain of simulated disaster rescue

Allocating Tasks in Extreme Teams

FARINELLI, Alessandro;
2005

Abstract

Extreme teams, large-scale agent teams operating in dynamic environments, are on the horizon. Such environments are problematic for current task allocation algorithms due to the lack of locality in agent interactions. We propose a novel distributed task allocation algorithm for extreme teams, called LA-DCOP, that incorporates three key ideas. First, LA-DCOP's task allocation is based on a dynamically computed minimum capability threshold which uses approximate knowledge of overall task load. Second, LA-DCOP uses tokens to represent tasks and further minimize communication. Third, it creates potential tokens to deal with inter-task constraints of simultaneous execution. We show that LA-DCOP convincingly outperforms competing distributed task allocation algorithms while using orders of magnitude fewer messages, allowing a dramatic scale-up in extreme teams, upto a fully distributed, proxybased team of 200 agents. Varying threshold are seen as a key to outperforming competing distributed algorithms in the domain of simulated disaster rescue
9781595930934
Multi-Agent Systems; Coordination; Task Assignment
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/326659
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