In recent years, there has been a growing interest in a diet low in fermentable oligosaccha- rides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) as a promising therapeutic approach to reduce the symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Hence, the development of low FODMAPs products is an important challenge for the food industry, and among the various foodstuffs associated with the intake of FODMAPs, cereal-based products represent an issue. In fact, even if their content in FODMAPs is limited, their large use in diet can be an important factor in developing IBS symptoms. Several useful approaches have been developed to reduce the FODMAPs content in processed food products. Accurate ingredient selection, the use of enzymes or selected yeasts, and the use of fermentation steps carried out by specific lactic bacteria associated with the use of sourdough represent the technical approaches that have been investigated, alone or in combination, to reduce the FODMAPs content in cereal-based products. This review aims to give an overview of the technological and biotechnological strategies applicable to the formulation of low-FODMAPs products, specifically formulated for consumers affected by IBS. In particular, bread has been the foodstuff mainly investigated throughout the years, but information on other raw or processed products has also been reported. Furthermore, taking into account the required holistic approach for IBS symptoms management, in this review, the use of bioactive compounds that have a positive impact on reducing IBS symptoms as added ingredients in low-FODMAPs products is also discussed.

Strategies for Producing Low FODMAPs Foodstuffs: Challenges and Perspectives

Roberta Tolve;Fabio Favati
2023-01-01

Abstract

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in a diet low in fermentable oligosaccha- rides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) as a promising therapeutic approach to reduce the symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Hence, the development of low FODMAPs products is an important challenge for the food industry, and among the various foodstuffs associated with the intake of FODMAPs, cereal-based products represent an issue. In fact, even if their content in FODMAPs is limited, their large use in diet can be an important factor in developing IBS symptoms. Several useful approaches have been developed to reduce the FODMAPs content in processed food products. Accurate ingredient selection, the use of enzymes or selected yeasts, and the use of fermentation steps carried out by specific lactic bacteria associated with the use of sourdough represent the technical approaches that have been investigated, alone or in combination, to reduce the FODMAPs content in cereal-based products. This review aims to give an overview of the technological and biotechnological strategies applicable to the formulation of low-FODMAPs products, specifically formulated for consumers affected by IBS. In particular, bread has been the foodstuff mainly investigated throughout the years, but information on other raw or processed products has also been reported. Furthermore, taking into account the required holistic approach for IBS symptoms management, in this review, the use of bioactive compounds that have a positive impact on reducing IBS symptoms as added ingredients in low-FODMAPs products is also discussed.
2023
irritable bowel syndrome; fermentable carbohydrates; functional food; dough fermentation; bioactive compounds
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1086088
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