Background: In the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) years, very elderly patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are referred to surgery with reluctance despite excellent hospital outcomes. A poorly assessed outcome of discharged survivors might further overlook the actual efficacy of the surgical strategy in this cohort. We thus evaluated life-expectancy and functional results in discharged survivors over 85 years operated on for AS.Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2013, 57 consecutive patients aged >= 85 years underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with or without concomitant procedures at our institution. Late survival rate (SR), New York Heart Associaion (NYHA) functional class and quality of life (RAND SF-36) were assessed. SR and quality of life (QoL) were than compared to the contemporary general population matched for age and gender, as calculated by the Italian National Institute of Statistics.Results: Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.8% (5 pts). In patients without concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), in-hospital mortality was 2.9%. Survival at 5 and 9 years was 57.7 +/- 8.4% and 17.9 +/- 11.4%, respectively. No predictors of late mortality including concomitant CABG were identified at Cox analysis. The mean NYHA class for long-term survivors improved from 3.1 to 1.6 (p<0.001). Survivors reported better QoL-scores compared to the age-and gender-matched contemporary general population in 4 RAND SF-36 domains. Life-expectancy resulted comparable to that predicted for the age and gender-matched general population.Conclusions: Isolated AVR in patients aged >= 85 years can be performed with acceptable risk. Survivors improve in NYHA class and, when compared to age-and gender-matched individuals, show a similar life expectancy and a no lower QoL.

Expectation and quality of life after aortic valve replacement over 85 years of age match those of the contemporary general population

Onorati, Francesco;Santini, Francesco
2016-01-01

Abstract

Background: In the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) years, very elderly patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are referred to surgery with reluctance despite excellent hospital outcomes. A poorly assessed outcome of discharged survivors might further overlook the actual efficacy of the surgical strategy in this cohort. We thus evaluated life-expectancy and functional results in discharged survivors over 85 years operated on for AS.Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2013, 57 consecutive patients aged >= 85 years underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with or without concomitant procedures at our institution. Late survival rate (SR), New York Heart Associaion (NYHA) functional class and quality of life (RAND SF-36) were assessed. SR and quality of life (QoL) were than compared to the contemporary general population matched for age and gender, as calculated by the Italian National Institute of Statistics.Results: Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.8% (5 pts). In patients without concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), in-hospital mortality was 2.9%. Survival at 5 and 9 years was 57.7 +/- 8.4% and 17.9 +/- 11.4%, respectively. No predictors of late mortality including concomitant CABG were identified at Cox analysis. The mean NYHA class for long-term survivors improved from 3.1 to 1.6 (p<0.001). Survivors reported better QoL-scores compared to the age-and gender-matched contemporary general population in 4 RAND SF-36 domains. Life-expectancy resulted comparable to that predicted for the age and gender-matched general population.Conclusions: Isolated AVR in patients aged >= 85 years can be performed with acceptable risk. Survivors improve in NYHA class and, when compared to age-and gender-matched individuals, show a similar life expectancy and a no lower QoL.
Aged, 80 and over; Aortic Valve; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Coronary Artery Bypass; Coronary Artery Disease; Female; Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation; Hospital Mortality; Humans; Male; Quality of Life; Recovery of Function; Retrospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Survival Analysis; Treatment Outcome; Life Expectancy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/997847
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