Most nurses have to interact with suffering patients and the distress elicited by these interactions may ultimately lead to burnout unless they efficiently regulate their emotional arousal. The aim of this study was to assess how a group of 86 nurses deal with this emotional distress, using the Regulation of Emotion System Survey (RESS: De France & Hollenstein, 2017). The RESS is a 24-item, self-report questionnaire that aims to assess on a common scale the individual’s propensity to use six emotion regulation strategies (Distraction, Rumination, Reappraisal, Suppression, Engagement, Arousal Control). In the Italian version it has been demonstrated to be a valid tool to measure multiple regulation strategies to down-regulate personal experiences of negative emotions. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used to assess participants’ levels of burnout.The results revealed that the most frequent strategies that the participants used during their job are Rumination, Reappraisal and Distraction. Rumination was significantly and positively correlated to Suppression and Engagement, whereas Reappraisal is associated with Distraction and Arousal Control. A SEM was run to test which strategies predict the three dimensions of the MBI: Rumination showed an effect on Emotional Exhaustion (B = .27, p = .01), whereas Distraction (B = -.30, p = .01), Suppression (B = .26, p = .02) and Arousal Control (B = .24, p = .04) were related to Depersonalisation. Interestingly, the relationships between Depersonalisation and both Distraction and Suppression was moderated by participant’s level of satisfaction with life.The results suggest that the RESS is a useful tool to assess nurses’ reactions to some aspects of their work experience because, in full, it is able to detect how some regulation strategies tend to be used together. Secondly, the data suggest that nurses’ life satisfaction moderated the effect of their emotion regulation strategies on burnout.

THE REGULATION OF EMOTION SYSTEM SURVEY (RESS) TO ASSESS NURSES’ EMOTIONAL REACTIONS TO SUFFERING PATIENTS

Meneghini Anna Maria;Colledani, Daiana;
2019

Abstract

Most nurses have to interact with suffering patients and the distress elicited by these interactions may ultimately lead to burnout unless they efficiently regulate their emotional arousal. The aim of this study was to assess how a group of 86 nurses deal with this emotional distress, using the Regulation of Emotion System Survey (RESS: De France & Hollenstein, 2017). The RESS is a 24-item, self-report questionnaire that aims to assess on a common scale the individual’s propensity to use six emotion regulation strategies (Distraction, Rumination, Reappraisal, Suppression, Engagement, Arousal Control). In the Italian version it has been demonstrated to be a valid tool to measure multiple regulation strategies to down-regulate personal experiences of negative emotions. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used to assess participants’ levels of burnout.The results revealed that the most frequent strategies that the participants used during their job are Rumination, Reappraisal and Distraction. Rumination was significantly and positively correlated to Suppression and Engagement, whereas Reappraisal is associated with Distraction and Arousal Control. A SEM was run to test which strategies predict the three dimensions of the MBI: Rumination showed an effect on Emotional Exhaustion (B = .27, p = .01), whereas Distraction (B = -.30, p = .01), Suppression (B = .26, p = .02) and Arousal Control (B = .24, p = .04) were related to Depersonalisation. Interestingly, the relationships between Depersonalisation and both Distraction and Suppression was moderated by participant’s level of satisfaction with life.The results suggest that the RESS is a useful tool to assess nurses’ reactions to some aspects of their work experience because, in full, it is able to detect how some regulation strategies tend to be used together. Secondly, the data suggest that nurses’ life satisfaction moderated the effect of their emotion regulation strategies on burnout.
Negative emotions
regulation
nurses
burnout
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/996968
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