Purpose. This paper will explore some effects of current mobile communication technologies on university-level education. For this study, mobile communication technologies include commonly employed devices especially smartphones connected to the Internet. University education as defined here will include conventional “face to face” classes with students located in the same physical space at the same time participating in a “synchronous” activity with a teacher, as well as internet-facilitated “asynchronous” teaching and learning. The focus of this work is student use of communication technologies that may be regarded as possible threats and/or opportunities confronting higher education. Methodology. In addition to a literature search, data for this exploratory study was collected from a short survey of undergraduate students and teachers at the Department of Management at the University of Verona, Italy; and additional data collected from students and teachers at the School of Engineering Technology, Eastern Michigan University, USA. Findings. Higher education cannot ignore this disruptive technology. However, the authors do not accept the widely-held premise that these technologies will obviate the necessity of the unique personal student-teacher interaction. Online resources and activities are already critical adjuncts to traditional classroom teaching and learning. There is a great need to change; especially in face-to-face classes with undergraduates which are often 75% theater and 25% academic content. Practical implications. The paper lends itself to initiating a critical discussion on planning the processes of change which will inevitably affect most universities. Originality/value. There is little current literature on the threats and opportunities articulated by this paper particularly by way of direct investigation in the field.

Some current effects of mobile communication technologies on university-level education

BACCARANI, Claudio;
2016-01-01

Abstract

Purpose. This paper will explore some effects of current mobile communication technologies on university-level education. For this study, mobile communication technologies include commonly employed devices especially smartphones connected to the Internet. University education as defined here will include conventional “face to face” classes with students located in the same physical space at the same time participating in a “synchronous” activity with a teacher, as well as internet-facilitated “asynchronous” teaching and learning. The focus of this work is student use of communication technologies that may be regarded as possible threats and/or opportunities confronting higher education. Methodology. In addition to a literature search, data for this exploratory study was collected from a short survey of undergraduate students and teachers at the Department of Management at the University of Verona, Italy; and additional data collected from students and teachers at the School of Engineering Technology, Eastern Michigan University, USA. Findings. Higher education cannot ignore this disruptive technology. However, the authors do not accept the widely-held premise that these technologies will obviate the necessity of the unique personal student-teacher interaction. Online resources and activities are already critical adjuncts to traditional classroom teaching and learning. There is a great need to change; especially in face-to-face classes with undergraduates which are often 75% theater and 25% academic content. Practical implications. The paper lends itself to initiating a critical discussion on planning the processes of change which will inevitably affect most universities. Originality/value. There is little current literature on the threats and opportunities articulated by this paper particularly by way of direct investigation in the field.
mobile communication technologies
internet
disruptive technologies
higher education
innovation
face to face course
on line course
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/958690
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