Purpose Interval training with small-sided games (SSGs) is effective for improving physical conditioning and technical skills in football. This descriptive study investigated the effect of a high volume of SSGs on physiological and perceptual response [heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE)] and technical actions in amateur adult football players. Methods Twelve male football players (age 22.5 ± 1.8 years, weight 72.6 ± 6.3 kg, height 1.76 ± 0.06 m) completed two indoor SSG formats (3 vs. 3 and 4 vs. 4) (twice each) composed of six sets of 4 min each, with 2 min of passive recovery. RPE and HR were measured to calculate exercise intensity. Each game was filmed to evaluate the technical actions; the recordings were analyzed using a hand notation system. Results Mean HR for the two SSG formats did not differ significantly; RPE scores were higher for the 3 vs. 3 as compared to the 4 vs. 4 games (42.5 ± 3.0 vs. 35.0 ± 10.3, respectively; p\0.05); and the number of technical actions (passes, target passes, and dribbling) decreased as the games progressed, with statistically significant differences between games 5 and 6 compared to game 1 (p\0.05), but not in the frequency of other technical actions (shots, interceptions, and tackles). Conclusions The decrease in the number of technical actions in both formats as the games progress beyond four sets of 4 min could annul the advantage of SSGs for technical skills training. These findings may help football coaches maximize the benefit of training with SSGs.

High volume training with small-sided games affects technical demands in football: a descriptive study

BEATO, MARCO;BERTINATO, Luciano;SCHENA, Federico
2014

Abstract

Purpose Interval training with small-sided games (SSGs) is effective for improving physical conditioning and technical skills in football. This descriptive study investigated the effect of a high volume of SSGs on physiological and perceptual response [heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE)] and technical actions in amateur adult football players. Methods Twelve male football players (age 22.5 ± 1.8 years, weight 72.6 ± 6.3 kg, height 1.76 ± 0.06 m) completed two indoor SSG formats (3 vs. 3 and 4 vs. 4) (twice each) composed of six sets of 4 min each, with 2 min of passive recovery. RPE and HR were measured to calculate exercise intensity. Each game was filmed to evaluate the technical actions; the recordings were analyzed using a hand notation system. Results Mean HR for the two SSG formats did not differ significantly; RPE scores were higher for the 3 vs. 3 as compared to the 4 vs. 4 games (42.5 ± 3.0 vs. 35.0 ± 10.3, respectively; p\0.05); and the number of technical actions (passes, target passes, and dribbling) decreased as the games progressed, with statistically significant differences between games 5 and 6 compared to game 1 (p\0.05), but not in the frequency of other technical actions (shots, interceptions, and tackles). Conclusions The decrease in the number of technical actions in both formats as the games progress beyond four sets of 4 min could annul the advantage of SSGs for technical skills training. These findings may help football coaches maximize the benefit of training with SSGs.
Coaching; exercise training; sport; physical performace
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/796564
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