Achievement emotions, as those emotions focused on achievement activities or outcomes, are usually measured by means of questionnaires (Pekrun & Stephens, 2012). To favour their evaluation in children, such instruments could present both verbal labels and graphical devices, facilitating a more direct access to the semantic network in which emotional information is stored. While there are many instruments assessing basic emotions through graphical aids such as photographs or drawings, scarce attention has been paid to instruments about a wider range of emotions, which could be variously used to assess children’s emotions related to learning. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explore the goodness of a second version of an instrument representing ten achievement emotions through depicted faces (Raccanello & Bianchetti, in press), also examining age differences. Second-graders, fifth-graders, and university students completed three written tasks assessing the correspondence between drawings of faces and ten achievement emotions (enjoyment, pride, hope, relief, relaxation, anxiety, anger, shame, boredom, and sadness): An agreement task (Study 1, n = 143), a matching task (Study 2, n = 145), and a naming task (Study 3, n = 136). The results suggested the goodness of the proposed instrument, confirming the correspondence between the pictorial representations and the hypothesized verbal labels, with some differences characterizing different age students. Notwithstanding possible limitations related to the characteristics of self-report or cross-sectional data, such instrument could be used in a variety of learning contexts to assess children’s emotions, for both research and educational purposes.

A second version of a pictorial instrument assessing achievement emotions in children and adults

RACCANELLO, Daniela;
2014

Abstract

Achievement emotions, as those emotions focused on achievement activities or outcomes, are usually measured by means of questionnaires (Pekrun & Stephens, 2012). To favour their evaluation in children, such instruments could present both verbal labels and graphical devices, facilitating a more direct access to the semantic network in which emotional information is stored. While there are many instruments assessing basic emotions through graphical aids such as photographs or drawings, scarce attention has been paid to instruments about a wider range of emotions, which could be variously used to assess children’s emotions related to learning. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explore the goodness of a second version of an instrument representing ten achievement emotions through depicted faces (Raccanello & Bianchetti, in press), also examining age differences. Second-graders, fifth-graders, and university students completed three written tasks assessing the correspondence between drawings of faces and ten achievement emotions (enjoyment, pride, hope, relief, relaxation, anxiety, anger, shame, boredom, and sadness): An agreement task (Study 1, n = 143), a matching task (Study 2, n = 145), and a naming task (Study 3, n = 136). The results suggested the goodness of the proposed instrument, confirming the correspondence between the pictorial representations and the hypothesized verbal labels, with some differences characterizing different age students. Notwithstanding possible limitations related to the characteristics of self-report or cross-sectional data, such instrument could be used in a variety of learning contexts to assess children’s emotions, for both research and educational purposes.
emotional faces; drawings; achievement emotions; children
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/742163
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