Aim: the aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between some anthropometric and body composition characteristics of wheeled athletes (WA) and sport-specific performance outcomes. For WA, reduced physical capacity in injured parts of the body would results in great alterations in their body composition. The assessment of body composition of WA could be an important way of measuring the results of an athlete’s training (1), as well as of achieving real improvements in performance and training quality. Method: 19 WA (12 basketball [WB] and 7 rugby [WR] players) were recruited after signed informed consent. Total body and regional body composition were evaluated by means of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry using a total body scanner (QDR Explorer W, Hologic). Stature, body circumferences (upper arm relaxed and wrist) and body lengths and widths (shoulder-elbow, elbow-wrist, transverse chest, anterior-posterior chest, elbow and wrist) were measured according to standard procedures. A battery of 5 reliable and valid (2) field test (‘5 meters sprint’, ‘slalom’, ‘20 meters sprint with ball’, ‘maximal pass’ and ‘suicide’) consisting of a combination of skills were used to evaluate the performance outcomes of WA. Measurements were taken at the beginning of the competitive season. Data were stratified by sport (WB and WR), and the Pearson's two-tailed product-moment correlation coefficient (r) was used to assess the correlation between anthropometric and body composition parameters and sport-specific performance outcomes. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results: no significant correlation was found between fat mass (at the total body and regional level) and sport-specific performance parameters. Significant positive correlations (P<0.05) were found between body composition parameters (total body bone mineral content and fat free mass, and trunk, right and left arm fat free mass) and performance, with exception of the ‘maximal pass’ test. The same was found for several body dimensions (shoulder-elbow, transverse chest, anterior-posterior chest and wrist) and upper arm relaxed circumference. ‘5 meters sprint’, ‘slalom’, ‘20 meters sprint with ball’ and ‘suicide’ test positively correlated with each other, while ‘maximal pass’ test negatively correlated with the other field tests.

Anthropometry, body composition and performance in wheelchair basketball and rugby players.

CAVEDON, Valentina;MILANESE, Chiara;PISCITELLI, Francesco;ZANCANARO, Carlo
2013

Abstract

Aim: the aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between some anthropometric and body composition characteristics of wheeled athletes (WA) and sport-specific performance outcomes. For WA, reduced physical capacity in injured parts of the body would results in great alterations in their body composition. The assessment of body composition of WA could be an important way of measuring the results of an athlete’s training (1), as well as of achieving real improvements in performance and training quality. Method: 19 WA (12 basketball [WB] and 7 rugby [WR] players) were recruited after signed informed consent. Total body and regional body composition were evaluated by means of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry using a total body scanner (QDR Explorer W, Hologic). Stature, body circumferences (upper arm relaxed and wrist) and body lengths and widths (shoulder-elbow, elbow-wrist, transverse chest, anterior-posterior chest, elbow and wrist) were measured according to standard procedures. A battery of 5 reliable and valid (2) field test (‘5 meters sprint’, ‘slalom’, ‘20 meters sprint with ball’, ‘maximal pass’ and ‘suicide’) consisting of a combination of skills were used to evaluate the performance outcomes of WA. Measurements were taken at the beginning of the competitive season. Data were stratified by sport (WB and WR), and the Pearson's two-tailed product-moment correlation coefficient (r) was used to assess the correlation between anthropometric and body composition parameters and sport-specific performance outcomes. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results: no significant correlation was found between fat mass (at the total body and regional level) and sport-specific performance parameters. Significant positive correlations (P<0.05) were found between body composition parameters (total body bone mineral content and fat free mass, and trunk, right and left arm fat free mass) and performance, with exception of the ‘maximal pass’ test. The same was found for several body dimensions (shoulder-elbow, transverse chest, anterior-posterior chest and wrist) and upper arm relaxed circumference. ‘5 meters sprint’, ‘slalom’, ‘20 meters sprint with ball’ and ‘suicide’ test positively correlated with each other, while ‘maximal pass’ test negatively correlated with the other field tests.
body composition; wheelchair; sports
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/653183
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