Recently, many authors have investigated the results of immediately loaded implants in fresh extraction sites, reporting favorable success rates, but only a few studies have included a long-term follow-up in the maxilla with analysis of clinical and radiographic data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictability of the immediate loading protocol with fast bone regeneration (FBR)-coated implants placed in postextractive sites in the maxilla, considering the success rate after at least 5 years of follow-up. Moreover, the clinical and radiographic results are evaluated in terms of soft tissue conditions and crestal bone loss values. One hundred fifty-eight implants were inserted following dental extraction in 70 consecutively operated patients. Each implant was immediately prosthesized. The data were collected before surgical planning, at the time of insertion, and after 3 and 5 years of occlusal loading. Specific success criteria were used to assess the success rate of immediately loaded postextraction implants. Clinical and radiographic examinations were used to determine long-term results. After a 5-year follow-up, 2 implants were lost, with a cumulative success rate of 98.7\%. The radiographic and clinical data revealed well-maintained hard and soft tissues, with acceptable long-term results. The use of immediately loaded FBR-coated implants in fresh extraction sockets is shown to be a predictable technique if implants are inserted in selected cases and positioned with great care, following thorough preoperative analysis.

Long-term results of immediately loaded fast bone regeneration-coated implants placed in fresh extraction sites in the upper jaw.

MALCHIODI, Luciano;CORROCHER, Giovanni;BISSOLOTTI, Guido;NOCINI, Pier Francesco
2010

Abstract

Recently, many authors have investigated the results of immediately loaded implants in fresh extraction sites, reporting favorable success rates, but only a few studies have included a long-term follow-up in the maxilla with analysis of clinical and radiographic data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictability of the immediate loading protocol with fast bone regeneration (FBR)-coated implants placed in postextractive sites in the maxilla, considering the success rate after at least 5 years of follow-up. Moreover, the clinical and radiographic results are evaluated in terms of soft tissue conditions and crestal bone loss values. One hundred fifty-eight implants were inserted following dental extraction in 70 consecutively operated patients. Each implant was immediately prosthesized. The data were collected before surgical planning, at the time of insertion, and after 3 and 5 years of occlusal loading. Specific success criteria were used to assess the success rate of immediately loaded postextraction implants. Clinical and radiographic examinations were used to determine long-term results. After a 5-year follow-up, 2 implants were lost, with a cumulative success rate of 98.7\%. The radiographic and clinical data revealed well-maintained hard and soft tissues, with acceptable long-term results. The use of immediately loaded FBR-coated implants in fresh extraction sockets is shown to be a predictable technique if implants are inserted in selected cases and positioned with great care, following thorough preoperative analysis.
Alveolar Bone Loss; etiology; Bone Regeneration; Coated Materials; Biocompatible; Dental Implantation; Endosseous; adverse effects/methods; Dental Implants; Dental Prosthesis Design; Dental Prosthesis; Implant-Supported; Dental Restoration Failure; Dental Stress Analysis; Humans; Maxilla; Time Factors; Tooth Socket; surgery; Treatment Outcome; Weight-Bearing
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/363480
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