Glioblastoma represents the most malignant and lethal among brain tumours because of its highly infiltration capacity and invasion into the normal brain that account for its resistance to treatments (chemotherapy and radiotherapy). Recent advance and development of technologies to non-invasively image brain tumour growth in living animals can open an opportunity to monitor directly the efficacy of the treatment on tumour development. In vivo bioluminescence imaging is based on light-emitting enzymes, luciferases, which require specific substrates for light production. When linked to a specific biological process/pathway in an animal model of human disease, the enzyme-substrate interactions become biological indicators that can be studied. In order to explore and compare different imaging modalities (MRI and bioluminescence imaging) we have validated the use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor glioblastoma progression in vivo. The human glioma cell line (DBTRG-05MG) derived from an adult patient with glioblastoma multiforme who had been treated with local brain irradiation and multidrug chemotherapy has been used for the experiment. The DBTRG-05MG cell line was stably transfected with TCF-luciferase and orthotopic implantated onto immunodeficient mice. Bioluminescence technology was used to follow tumour growth in parallel with classical MRI on the same animals.

Bioluminescence imaging in brain tumor: a powerful tool

CALDERAN, Laura;BOSCHI, Federico;MARZOLA, Pasquina;NICOLATO, Elena;SBARBATI, Andrea
2008-01-01

Abstract

Glioblastoma represents the most malignant and lethal among brain tumours because of its highly infiltration capacity and invasion into the normal brain that account for its resistance to treatments (chemotherapy and radiotherapy). Recent advance and development of technologies to non-invasively image brain tumour growth in living animals can open an opportunity to monitor directly the efficacy of the treatment on tumour development. In vivo bioluminescence imaging is based on light-emitting enzymes, luciferases, which require specific substrates for light production. When linked to a specific biological process/pathway in an animal model of human disease, the enzyme-substrate interactions become biological indicators that can be studied. In order to explore and compare different imaging modalities (MRI and bioluminescence imaging) we have validated the use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor glioblastoma progression in vivo. The human glioma cell line (DBTRG-05MG) derived from an adult patient with glioblastoma multiforme who had been treated with local brain irradiation and multidrug chemotherapy has been used for the experiment. The DBTRG-05MG cell line was stably transfected with TCF-luciferase and orthotopic implantated onto immunodeficient mice. Bioluminescence technology was used to follow tumour growth in parallel with classical MRI on the same animals.
optical imaging in vivo glioblastoma
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/321832
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