BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Among late complications after the Ross operation, autograft dilatation is likely the most common. In order to define prevalence, consequences and management of autograft dilatation, a 10-year clinical experience was reviewed. METHODS: A total of 112 patients (mean age 29 +/- 10 years) underwent cross-sectional echocardiographic follow up. End-points of the study were freedom from autograft dilatation (diameter >4 cm, indexed as 0.21 cm/m2) and from reoperation for dilatation. Risk factors for autograft dilatation were also identified. RESULTS: There were 110 late survivors; average follow up was 5.1 +/- 1.9 years (range: 0.3 to 10.6 years). At 10 years, autograft dilatation was identified in 32 patients (29%), compatible with aortic aneurysm (>5.0 cm) in seven patients (6%). Seven of 32 patients (22%) presented moderate or greater autograft insufficiency. Ten-year freedom from dilatation was 43 +/- 8%, and from regurgitation was 75 +/- 8%. At multivariate analysis, preoperative aneurysm (p = 0.02), root replacement technique (p = 0.03) and absence of root buttressing (p = 0.04) were predictive of dilatation. Reoperation for autograft aneurysm was performed in five patients at a mean of 7.3 +/- 0.8 years after the Ross procedure, while two patients await reintervention. Two patients had root replacement and three remodeling with valve preservation (two root replacements, one sinotubular junction replacement): all survived reoperation. Ten-year freedom from root reoperation was 81 +/- 6%, and from full root replacement was 94 +/- 2%. CONCLUSION: With increasing follow up after the Ross operation, the incidences of root dilatation and reoperation are likely to rise. Graft replacement of coexisting aneurysm, avoidance of root replacement technique and the use of root-stabilization measures may reduce the prevalence of late root pathology. Early replacement of dilated autograft roots may allow preservation of the autologous pulmonary valve.

Reoperations for aortic aneurysm after the Ross procedure.

LUCIANI, GIOVANNI BATTISTA;CASALI, Gianluca;SANTINI, Francesco;MAZZUCCO, Alessandro
2005

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: Among late complications after the Ross operation, autograft dilatation is likely the most common. In order to define prevalence, consequences and management of autograft dilatation, a 10-year clinical experience was reviewed. METHODS: A total of 112 patients (mean age 29 +/- 10 years) underwent cross-sectional echocardiographic follow up. End-points of the study were freedom from autograft dilatation (diameter >4 cm, indexed as 0.21 cm/m2) and from reoperation for dilatation. Risk factors for autograft dilatation were also identified. RESULTS: There were 110 late survivors; average follow up was 5.1 +/- 1.9 years (range: 0.3 to 10.6 years). At 10 years, autograft dilatation was identified in 32 patients (29%), compatible with aortic aneurysm (>5.0 cm) in seven patients (6%). Seven of 32 patients (22%) presented moderate or greater autograft insufficiency. Ten-year freedom from dilatation was 43 +/- 8%, and from regurgitation was 75 +/- 8%. At multivariate analysis, preoperative aneurysm (p = 0.02), root replacement technique (p = 0.03) and absence of root buttressing (p = 0.04) were predictive of dilatation. Reoperation for autograft aneurysm was performed in five patients at a mean of 7.3 +/- 0.8 years after the Ross procedure, while two patients await reintervention. Two patients had root replacement and three remodeling with valve preservation (two root replacements, one sinotubular junction replacement): all survived reoperation. Ten-year freedom from root reoperation was 81 +/- 6%, and from full root replacement was 94 +/- 2%. CONCLUSION: With increasing follow up after the Ross operation, the incidences of root dilatation and reoperation are likely to rise. Graft replacement of coexisting aneurysm, avoidance of root replacement technique and the use of root-stabilization measures may reduce the prevalence of late root pathology. Early replacement of dilated autograft roots may allow preservation of the autologous pulmonary valve.
PULMONARY AUTOGRAFT; ASCENDING AORTA; ROOT; OPERATION; DILATATION; POSITION; CHILDREN; ADULTS; REPLACEMENT; DISSECTION
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/29448
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