The article highlights the absence of portraits or self-portraits by and of female painters in Venice and in Veneto during the Renaissance. Even the famous Marietta Robusti, Tintoretto’s daughter, lacks a plausible likeness. The painting traditionally thought to be her self-portrait in the Uffizi and the engraving in Ridolfi’s Maravglie in fact have nothing to do with her, as is demonstrated, above all, by the analysis of the clothing in these images. The same can be said for Cecilia Brusasorci, whose portrait belongs to the XIX century.

Donne senza volto: le pittrici venete del Rinascimento

Alessandra Zamperini
2022-01-01

Abstract

The article highlights the absence of portraits or self-portraits by and of female painters in Venice and in Veneto during the Renaissance. Even the famous Marietta Robusti, Tintoretto’s daughter, lacks a plausible likeness. The painting traditionally thought to be her self-portrait in the Uffizi and the engraving in Ridolfi’s Maravglie in fact have nothing to do with her, as is demonstrated, above all, by the analysis of the clothing in these images. The same can be said for Cecilia Brusasorci, whose portrait belongs to the XIX century.
978-88-86168-35-9
Gender Studies
Iconography
History of Fashion
Marietta Tintoretto (Tintoretta)
Cecilia Brusasorzi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1081823
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