BACKGROUND: The impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on surgery is still not well defined. We sought to characterize the association of preoperative CKD with 30-day mortality after hepatic resection.METHODS: Patients included in the American College of Surgeons (ACS) NSQIP who underwent hepatectomy between 2014 and 2018 were identified. Kidney function was stratified according to the "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Classification: G1, normal/high function (estimated glomerular-filtration-rate >= 90 ml/min/1.73m(2)); G2-3, mild/moderate CKD (89-30 ml/min/1.73m(2)); G4-5, severe CKD (<= 29 ml/min/1.73m(2)).RESULTS: Overall, 18,321 patients were included. Older patients (ie more than 70 years old) and those with serious medical comorbidities (ie American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] class 3) had an increased incidence of severe CKD (both p < 0.001). Patients with G2-3 and G4-5 CKD were more likely to have a prolonged length of stay and to experience postoperative complications (both p < 0.001). Adjusted odds of 30-day mortality increased with the worsening CKD (p = 0.03). The degree of CKD was able to stratify patients within the NSQIP risk calculator. Among patients who underwent major hepatectomy for primary cancer, the rate of 30-day mortality was 2-fold higher with G2-3 and G4-5 CKD vs normal kidney function (p = 0.03).CONCLUSIONS: The degree of CKD was related to the risk of complications and 30-day mortality after hepatectomy. CKD classification should be strongly considered in the preoperative risk estimation of these patients. (C) 2022 by the American College of Surgeons. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Classification of Chronic Kidney Disease and Short-Term Outcomes of Patients Undergoing Liver Resection

Bagante, Fabio;Alaimo, Laura;Dalbeni, Andrea;Ruzzenente, Andrea;Donadello, Katia;Spolverato, Gaya;Guglielmi, Alfredo;
2022-01-01

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on surgery is still not well defined. We sought to characterize the association of preoperative CKD with 30-day mortality after hepatic resection.METHODS: Patients included in the American College of Surgeons (ACS) NSQIP who underwent hepatectomy between 2014 and 2018 were identified. Kidney function was stratified according to the "Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) Classification: G1, normal/high function (estimated glomerular-filtration-rate >= 90 ml/min/1.73m(2)); G2-3, mild/moderate CKD (89-30 ml/min/1.73m(2)); G4-5, severe CKD (<= 29 ml/min/1.73m(2)).RESULTS: Overall, 18,321 patients were included. Older patients (ie more than 70 years old) and those with serious medical comorbidities (ie American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] class 3) had an increased incidence of severe CKD (both p < 0.001). Patients with G2-3 and G4-5 CKD were more likely to have a prolonged length of stay and to experience postoperative complications (both p < 0.001). Adjusted odds of 30-day mortality increased with the worsening CKD (p = 0.03). The degree of CKD was able to stratify patients within the NSQIP risk calculator. Among patients who underwent major hepatectomy for primary cancer, the rate of 30-day mortality was 2-fold higher with G2-3 and G4-5 CKD vs normal kidney function (p = 0.03).CONCLUSIONS: The degree of CKD was related to the risk of complications and 30-day mortality after hepatectomy. CKD classification should be strongly considered in the preoperative risk estimation of these patients. (C) 2022 by the American College of Surgeons. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
Aged
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Liver
Male
Postoperative Complications
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Hepatectomy
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1078655
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