Candidemia is a challenging clinical condition with high rates of morbidity and mortality.1 Key requirements for its prompt management include early identification and timely initiation of appropriate systemic antifungal therapy, consistently reported as a major determinant of survival. However, the diagnosis of candidemia can be challenging and is often delayed as there are no specific clinical signs, blood cultures have low sensitivity, and detection of fungal blood cultures takes a long time. In addition, there is evidence that a significant percentage of such infections occurs in patients admitted to internal medicine departments. This is not particularly surprising given the advanced age of many inpatients at internal medicine departments and multiple complex comorbidities. Moreover, related therapies and healthcare system contacts often involve the use of central venous catheters and other indwelling devices, potentially entailing high risk of candidemia.2 Therefore, optimization of the diagnostic and therapeutic approach is an important and still unfulfilled need for the management of candidemia in internal medicine departments

Predicting candidemia in internal medicine departments: are we chasing the Holy Grail?

Azzini AM;Concia E;Lo Cascio G;Tedesco A;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Candidemia is a challenging clinical condition with high rates of morbidity and mortality.1 Key requirements for its prompt management include early identification and timely initiation of appropriate systemic antifungal therapy, consistently reported as a major determinant of survival. However, the diagnosis of candidemia can be challenging and is often delayed as there are no specific clinical signs, blood cultures have low sensitivity, and detection of fungal blood cultures takes a long time. In addition, there is evidence that a significant percentage of such infections occurs in patients admitted to internal medicine departments. This is not particularly surprising given the advanced age of many inpatients at internal medicine departments and multiple complex comorbidities. Moreover, related therapies and healthcare system contacts often involve the use of central venous catheters and other indwelling devices, potentially entailing high risk of candidemia.2 Therefore, optimization of the diagnostic and therapeutic approach is an important and still unfulfilled need for the management of candidemia in internal medicine departments
canidemia
internal medicine
beta-D-glucan
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1058257
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