Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are characterized by abdominal pain, bloating and bowel disturbances. FGID therapy is primarily symptomatic, including treatment with herbal remedies. Flower extract of Tilia tomentosa Moench (TtM) is occasionally used as an anti-spasmodic in popular medicine. Since its effect on intestinal response is unknown, we evaluated the influence of TtM extract on small intestine contractility. Ileal preparations from C57BL/6J mice were mounted in organ baths to assess changes in muscle tension, following addition of TtM extract (0.5-36 mu g/mL) or a vehicle (ethanol). Changes in contractile response to receptor- and non-receptor-mediated stimuli were assessed in ileal preparations pretreated with 12 mu g/mL TtM. Alterations in the enteric nervous system neuroglial network were analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence. Increasing addition of TtM induced a marked relaxation in ileal specimens compared to the vehicle. Pretreatment with TtM affected cholinergic and tachykininergic neuromuscular contractions as well as K+-induced smooth muscle depolarization. Following incubation with TtM, a significant reduction in non-adrenergic non-cholinergic-mediated relaxation sensitive to N omega-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (pan-nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) was found. In vitro incubation of intestinal specimens with TtM did not affect the myenteric plexus neuroglial network. Our findings show that TtM-induced intestinal relaxation is mediated by nitric oxide pathways, providing a pharmacological basis for the use of TtM in FGIDs.

Influence of Tilia tomentosa Moench Extract on Mouse Small Intestine Neuromuscular Contractility

Federica Mainente;Gianni ZOCCATELLI;
2021

Abstract

Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are characterized by abdominal pain, bloating and bowel disturbances. FGID therapy is primarily symptomatic, including treatment with herbal remedies. Flower extract of Tilia tomentosa Moench (TtM) is occasionally used as an anti-spasmodic in popular medicine. Since its effect on intestinal response is unknown, we evaluated the influence of TtM extract on small intestine contractility. Ileal preparations from C57BL/6J mice were mounted in organ baths to assess changes in muscle tension, following addition of TtM extract (0.5-36 mu g/mL) or a vehicle (ethanol). Changes in contractile response to receptor- and non-receptor-mediated stimuli were assessed in ileal preparations pretreated with 12 mu g/mL TtM. Alterations in the enteric nervous system neuroglial network were analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence. Increasing addition of TtM induced a marked relaxation in ileal specimens compared to the vehicle. Pretreatment with TtM affected cholinergic and tachykininergic neuromuscular contractions as well as K+-induced smooth muscle depolarization. Following incubation with TtM, a significant reduction in non-adrenergic non-cholinergic-mediated relaxation sensitive to N omega-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (pan-nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) was found. In vitro incubation of intestinal specimens with TtM did not affect the myenteric plexus neuroglial network. Our findings show that TtM-induced intestinal relaxation is mediated by nitric oxide pathways, providing a pharmacological basis for the use of TtM in FGIDs.
Tilia tomentosa Moench
cholinergic neurotransmission
enteric nervous system
functional gastrointestinal disorders
intestinal contractile response
linden flower
nitrergic pathways
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1057039
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