: Recent advances in the field of tissue regeneration are offering promising therapeutic options for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. This study aimed to evaluate the glucose absorptive capacity of a neoformed intestine obtained from a biological scaffold in a rodent model and the steadiness of the engrafted segment area. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for this study. Under anesthesia, a patch of biological material (2.2 × 1.5 cm) was engrafted in the anti-mesenteric border of the small bowels of 12 rats. Twelve rats were sham-operated. Animals were studied at 4, 8, and 10 months postengraftment. Functional and histological analyses were performed. The functional analysis was performed using an 18F-FDG analog as a probe and the results were acquired with an optical imager. The intensity of the fluorescent signal emitted by the neointestine was comparable with that emitted by the native intestine in all animals and was visible after injection in the preserved mesentery. The mean intestinal volume at time of engraftment and after 10 months was 4.08 cm3 (95% CI [3.58-4.58]) and 3.26 cm3 (CI 95% [3.23-3.29]), respectively, with a mean shrinkage of 17.3% (range 10.6-23.8%), without any evidence of stenosis. Morphological analysis revealed the progression of the biological material toward a neoformed intestine similar to the native intestine, especially at 8 and 10 months. In a rodent model, we demonstrated that a neointestine, obtained from a biological scaffold showed glucose absorption and a durable increase in diameter.

Evidence of glucose absorption in a neoformed intestine

Paiella, Salvatore;Boschi, Federico;Luchini, Claudio;Perri, Giampaolo;Gasparini, Clizia;Aresta, Alex;Scarpa, Aldo;Salvia, Roberto;Bassi, Claudio
2022-01-01

Abstract

: Recent advances in the field of tissue regeneration are offering promising therapeutic options for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. This study aimed to evaluate the glucose absorptive capacity of a neoformed intestine obtained from a biological scaffold in a rodent model and the steadiness of the engrafted segment area. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for this study. Under anesthesia, a patch of biological material (2.2 × 1.5 cm) was engrafted in the anti-mesenteric border of the small bowels of 12 rats. Twelve rats were sham-operated. Animals were studied at 4, 8, and 10 months postengraftment. Functional and histological analyses were performed. The functional analysis was performed using an 18F-FDG analog as a probe and the results were acquired with an optical imager. The intensity of the fluorescent signal emitted by the neointestine was comparable with that emitted by the native intestine in all animals and was visible after injection in the preserved mesentery. The mean intestinal volume at time of engraftment and after 10 months was 4.08 cm3 (95% CI [3.58-4.58]) and 3.26 cm3 (CI 95% [3.23-3.29]), respectively, with a mean shrinkage of 17.3% (range 10.6-23.8%), without any evidence of stenosis. Morphological analysis revealed the progression of the biological material toward a neoformed intestine similar to the native intestine, especially at 8 and 10 months. In a rodent model, we demonstrated that a neointestine, obtained from a biological scaffold showed glucose absorption and a durable increase in diameter.
Biological scaffolds
Glucose absorption
Neointestine
Short bowel surgery
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1056115
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