Purpose: Vascular dysfunction has been demonstrated in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Exercise is known to positively affect vascular function. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate exercise-induced effects on vascular function in AD. Methods: Thirty-nine patients with AD (79 ± 8 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to exercise training (EX, n = 20) or control group (CTRL, n = 19). All subjects performed 72 treatment sessions (90 min, 3 t/w). EX included moderate-high-intensity aerobic and strength training. CTRL included cognitive stimuli (visual, verbal, auditive). Before and after the 6-month treatment, the vascular function was measured by passive-leg movement test (PLM, calculating the variation in blood flow: ∆peak; and area under the curve: AUC) tests, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD, %). A blood sample was analyzed for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Arterial blood flow (BF) and shear rate (SR) were measured during EX and CTRL during a typical treatment session. Results: EX group has increased FMD% (+ 3.725%, p < 0.001), PLM ∆peak (+ 99.056 ml/min, p = 0.004), AUC (+ 37.359AU, p = 0.037) and VEGF (+ 8.825 pg/ml, p = 0.004). In the CTRL group, no difference between pre- and post-treatment was found for any variable. Increase in BF and SR was demonstrated during EX (BF + 123%, p < 0.05; SR + 134%, p < 0.05), but not during CTRL treatment. Conclusion: Exercise training improves peripheral vascular function in AD. These ameliorations may be due to the repetitive increase in SR during exercise which triggers NO and VEGF upregulation. This approach might be included in standard AD clinical practice as an effective strategy to treat vascular dysfunction in this population.

Exercise training improves vascular function in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

Pedrinolla, Anna;Venturelli, Massimo
;
Fonte, Cristina;Tamburin, Stefano;Varalta, Valentina;Giuriato, Gaia;Smania, Nicola;Schena, Federico
2020

Abstract

Purpose: Vascular dysfunction has been demonstrated in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Exercise is known to positively affect vascular function. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate exercise-induced effects on vascular function in AD. Methods: Thirty-nine patients with AD (79 ± 8 years) were recruited and randomly assigned to exercise training (EX, n = 20) or control group (CTRL, n = 19). All subjects performed 72 treatment sessions (90 min, 3 t/w). EX included moderate-high-intensity aerobic and strength training. CTRL included cognitive stimuli (visual, verbal, auditive). Before and after the 6-month treatment, the vascular function was measured by passive-leg movement test (PLM, calculating the variation in blood flow: ∆peak; and area under the curve: AUC) tests, and flow-mediated dilation (FMD, %). A blood sample was analyzed for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Arterial blood flow (BF) and shear rate (SR) were measured during EX and CTRL during a typical treatment session. Results: EX group has increased FMD% (+ 3.725%, p < 0.001), PLM ∆peak (+ 99.056 ml/min, p = 0.004), AUC (+ 37.359AU, p = 0.037) and VEGF (+ 8.825 pg/ml, p = 0.004). In the CTRL group, no difference between pre- and post-treatment was found for any variable. Increase in BF and SR was demonstrated during EX (BF + 123%, p < 0.05; SR + 134%, p < 0.05), but not during CTRL treatment. Conclusion: Exercise training improves peripheral vascular function in AD. These ameliorations may be due to the repetitive increase in SR during exercise which triggers NO and VEGF upregulation. This approach might be included in standard AD clinical practice as an effective strategy to treat vascular dysfunction in this population.
dementia
physical activity
flow-mediated dilation
passive-leg movement
vascular endothelial growth factor
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Pedrinolla_et_al-2020-European_Journal_of_Applied_Physiology.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Accesso ristretto
Dimensione 794.64 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
794.64 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1022279
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 5
social impact