Running economy (RE) has been defined as the most important determining factor in endurance performance in both elite and recreational runners. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of flywheel strength training (FST) and high-intensity training (HIT) protocols on RE and strength parameters in a group of recreational runners. Twenty-nine recreational runners were recruited to take part in the study and were randomly assigned to FST (n = 9; 44.5 ± 6.0 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 48.8 ± 5.2 ml·min·kg), HIT (n = 9; 42.2 ± 8.6 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 50.3 ± 3.7 ml·min·kg), or low-intensity training (LIT) (n = 11; 45.4 ± 8.0 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 50.2 ± 6.8 ml min kg) groups. Before and after 8 weeks of an experimental period, maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), ventilatory thresholds (VTs), maximal dynamic force (1 repetition maximum [1RM]), and anthropometric data were evaluated. The FST group showed significant increases (p < 0.05) in 1RM and RE. No differences were found in the other groups. Significative changes are found for all groups on average speed on 2 and 10 km (p < 0.05). Anthropometric data were unchanged after the training period. The results of this study indicate that in recreational runners, FST seems able to obtain improvements in RE and neuromuscular adaptation.

Effects of flywheel strength training on the running economy of recreational endurance runners

Festa, Luca;Tarperi, Cantor
;
Boccia, Gennaro;Lippi, Giuseppe;Schena, Federico
2019

Abstract

Running economy (RE) has been defined as the most important determining factor in endurance performance in both elite and recreational runners. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of flywheel strength training (FST) and high-intensity training (HIT) protocols on RE and strength parameters in a group of recreational runners. Twenty-nine recreational runners were recruited to take part in the study and were randomly assigned to FST (n = 9; 44.5 ± 6.0 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 48.8 ± 5.2 ml·min·kg), HIT (n = 9; 42.2 ± 8.6 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 50.3 ± 3.7 ml·min·kg), or low-intensity training (LIT) (n = 11; 45.4 ± 8.0 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 50.2 ± 6.8 ml min kg) groups. Before and after 8 weeks of an experimental period, maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max), ventilatory thresholds (VTs), maximal dynamic force (1 repetition maximum [1RM]), and anthropometric data were evaluated. The FST group showed significant increases (p < 0.05) in 1RM and RE. No differences were found in the other groups. Significative changes are found for all groups on average speed on 2 and 10 km (p < 0.05). Anthropometric data were unchanged after the training period. The results of this study indicate that in recreational runners, FST seems able to obtain improvements in RE and neuromuscular adaptation.
strength training; running economy;, endurance; performance
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/992007
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