Aortic arch repair in newborns and infants has traditionally been accomplished using a period of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. To reduce neurologic and cardiac dysfunction related to circulatory arrest and myocardial ischemia during complex aortic arch surgery, an alternative and novel strategy for cerebro-myocardial protection was recently developed, where regional low-flow perfusion is combined with controlled and independent coronary perfusion. The aim of the present retrospective study was to assess short-term and mid-term results of selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery. From April 2008 to August 2015, 28 consecutive neonates underwent aortic arch surgery under cerebro-myocardial perfusion. There were 17 male and 11 female, with median age of 15 days (3-30 days) and median body weight of 3 kg (1.6-4.2 kg), 9 (32%) of whom with low body weight (<2.5 kg). The spectrum of pathologies treated was heterogeneous and included 13 neonates having single-stage biventricular repair (46%), 7 staged biventricular repair (25%), and 8 single-ventricle repair (29%). All operations were performed under moderate hypothermia and with a "beating heart and brain." Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 131 ± 64 min (42-310 min). A period of cardiac arrest to complete intra-cardiac repair was required in nine patients (32%), and circulatory arrest in 1 to repair total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 30 ± 11 min (15-69 min). Renal dysfunction, requiring a period of peritoneal dialysis was observed in 10 (36%) patients, while liver dysfunction was noted only in 3 (11%). There were three (11%) early and two late deaths during a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 6 months-7.7 years), with an actuarial survival of 82% at 7 years. At latest follow-up, no patient showed signs of cardiac or neurologic dysfunction. The present experience shows that a strategy of selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion is safe, versatile, and feasible in high-risk neonates with complex congenital arch pathology. Encouraging outcomes were noted in terms of cardiac and neurological function, with limited end-organ morbidity.

Selective Cerebro-Myocardial Perfusion in Complex Neonatal Aortic Arch Pathology: Midterm Results

Hoxha, Stiljan;Abbasciano, Riccardo Giuseppe;Sandrini, Camilla;Rossetti, Lucia;Menon, Tiziano;Barozzi, Luca;Linardi, Daniele;Rungatscher, Alessio;Faggian, Giuseppe;Luciani, Giovanni Battista
2018

Abstract

Aortic arch repair in newborns and infants has traditionally been accomplished using a period of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. To reduce neurologic and cardiac dysfunction related to circulatory arrest and myocardial ischemia during complex aortic arch surgery, an alternative and novel strategy for cerebro-myocardial protection was recently developed, where regional low-flow perfusion is combined with controlled and independent coronary perfusion. The aim of the present retrospective study was to assess short-term and mid-term results of selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery. From April 2008 to August 2015, 28 consecutive neonates underwent aortic arch surgery under cerebro-myocardial perfusion. There were 17 male and 11 female, with median age of 15 days (3-30 days) and median body weight of 3 kg (1.6-4.2 kg), 9 (32%) of whom with low body weight (<2.5 kg). The spectrum of pathologies treated was heterogeneous and included 13 neonates having single-stage biventricular repair (46%), 7 staged biventricular repair (25%), and 8 single-ventricle repair (29%). All operations were performed under moderate hypothermia and with a "beating heart and brain." Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 131 ± 64 min (42-310 min). A period of cardiac arrest to complete intra-cardiac repair was required in nine patients (32%), and circulatory arrest in 1 to repair total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 30 ± 11 min (15-69 min). Renal dysfunction, requiring a period of peritoneal dialysis was observed in 10 (36%) patients, while liver dysfunction was noted only in 3 (11%). There were three (11%) early and two late deaths during a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 6 months-7.7 years), with an actuarial survival of 82% at 7 years. At latest follow-up, no patient showed signs of cardiac or neurologic dysfunction. The present experience shows that a strategy of selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion is safe, versatile, and feasible in high-risk neonates with complex congenital arch pathology. Encouraging outcomes were noted in terms of cardiac and neurological function, with limited end-organ morbidity.
-Aortic arch hypoplasia; -Aortic coarctation; -Cerebral perfusion; -Interrupted aortic arch; -Myocardial perfusion; -Neonatal aortic arch surgery; Complex congenital heart disease; Aorta, Thoracic; Aortic Diseases; Brain; Cardiopulmonary Bypass; Circulatory Arrest, Deep Hypothermia Induced; Coronary Vessels; Feasibility Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Heart; Humans; Hypothermia, Induced; Infant, Newborn; Ischemia; Male; Nervous System Diseases; Perfusion; Retrospective Studies; Time Factors; Vascular Surgical Procedures
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/989624
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