The article examines the appearance of opium as a material evidence of 'otherness' in Victorian Culture and Literature, where it becomes a primary means for a rich in consequences populistic reading of a reverse colonization. Works under examination are those by De Quincey, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens's 'Edwin Drood', Rudyard Kipling, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Conrad, and the significant first novel by Joseph Conrad: 'Almayer’s Folly'.

Food for Dreams and an Appetite for Nations: Opium and Darwinian Metaphors in Victorian Literature

Y. BEZRUCKA
2018-01-01

Abstract

The article examines the appearance of opium as a material evidence of 'otherness' in Victorian Culture and Literature, where it becomes a primary means for a rich in consequences populistic reading of a reverse colonization. Works under examination are those by De Quincey, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens's 'Edwin Drood', Rudyard Kipling, Oscar Wilde, Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Conrad, and the significant first novel by Joseph Conrad: 'Almayer’s Folly'.
Opium in English Literature, Opium Wars, Darwinism, Opium and Drugs Law, Material Culture, Cultural Studies, Body-Politics, Affect-Theory, De Quincey, Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens, Edwin Drood, Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Conrad, Almayer’s Folly,
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/979887
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