Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers. Its aggressiveness is driven by an intense fibrotic desmoplastic reaction in which the increasingly collagen I-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) and several cell types, including cancer stem cells (CSCs), create a tumor-supportive environment. However, how ECM composition regulates CSC dynamics and their relationship to the principal parenchymal tumor population to promote early invasive growth is not yet characterized. For this we utilized a platform of 3D organotypic cultures composed of laminin-rich Matrigel, representative of an early tumor, plus increasing concentrations of collagen I to simulate malignant stroma progression. As ECM collagen I increases, CSCs progress from a rapidly growing, vascular phenotype to a slower growing, avascular phase, while maintaining their endothelial-like gene signatures. This transition is supported autocrinically by the CSCs and paracrinically by the parenchymal cells via their ECM-dependent secretomes. Indeed, when growing on an early tumor ECM, the CSCs are dedicated towards the preparation of a vascular niche by (1) activating their growth program, (2) secreting high levels of pro-angiogenic factors which stimulate both angiogenesis and vasculogenic mimicry and (3) overexpressing VEGFR-2, which is activated by VEGF secreted by both the CSC and parenchymal cells. On Matrigel the more differentiated parenchymal tumor cell population had reduced growth but a high invasive capacity. This concerted high local invasion of parenchymal cells into the CSC-derived vascular network suggests that a symbiotic relationship between the parenchymal cells and the CSCs underlies the initiation and maintenance of early PDAC infiltration and metastasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Extracellular Matrix composition modulates PDAC parenchymal and stem cell plasticity and behavior through the secretome

Biondani, Giulia;Dando, Ilaria;Pozza, Elisa Dalla;Forciniti, Stefania;Palmieri, Marta
;
2018

Abstract

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers. Its aggressiveness is driven by an intense fibrotic desmoplastic reaction in which the increasingly collagen I-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) and several cell types, including cancer stem cells (CSCs), create a tumor-supportive environment. However, how ECM composition regulates CSC dynamics and their relationship to the principal parenchymal tumor population to promote early invasive growth is not yet characterized. For this we utilized a platform of 3D organotypic cultures composed of laminin-rich Matrigel, representative of an early tumor, plus increasing concentrations of collagen I to simulate malignant stroma progression. As ECM collagen I increases, CSCs progress from a rapidly growing, vascular phenotype to a slower growing, avascular phase, while maintaining their endothelial-like gene signatures. This transition is supported autocrinically by the CSCs and paracrinically by the parenchymal cells via their ECM-dependent secretomes. Indeed, when growing on an early tumor ECM, the CSCs are dedicated towards the preparation of a vascular niche by (1) activating their growth program, (2) secreting high levels of pro-angiogenic factors which stimulate both angiogenesis and vasculogenic mimicry and (3) overexpressing VEGFR-2, which is activated by VEGF secreted by both the CSC and parenchymal cells. On Matrigel the more differentiated parenchymal tumor cell population had reduced growth but a high invasive capacity. This concerted high local invasion of parenchymal cells into the CSC-derived vascular network suggests that a symbiotic relationship between the parenchymal cells and the CSCs underlies the initiation and maintenance of early PDAC infiltration and metastasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
3D organotypic cultures; Cancer stem cells; Desmoplastic Reaction; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; VEFGR-2; Vasculogenic mimicry
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/978842
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