Background: Whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) has become increasingly popular under the promise to offer a time-saving and effective exercise protocols. Few studies estimating the training intervention intensity of WB-EMS are available in the literature. Aim: The aim of this study was first to estimate the metabolic demand and muscle fatigue induced by a training session with WB-EMS, and second to compare them to a control intervention. Methods: Ten young participants performed two training sessions: an experimental condition constituted by five exercises with superimposed WB-EMS and a control condition constituted by five body weight exercises. Both sessions lasted 15 min and were based on isometric intermittent contraction (6 of contraction interspersed by 4 s of rest). Muscle fatigue was assessed by determining the force decrease in the following tests: isometric mid-thigh pull; plyometric push-up; counter-movement jump. Oxygen consumption and energy expenditure were recorded by measuring respiratory gases exchange to quantify the metabolic demand of the exercises. Results: The WB-EMS intervention required greater volume of oxygen consumed (WB-EMS 1584 ± 251 ml/min; control 1465 ± 216 ml/min, p = 0.006) and energy expenditure (WB-EMS 470 ± 71 kcal/h; control 438 ± 61 kcal/h, p = 0.013) than in control intervention. Overall, the WB-EMS training induced muscle fatigue (all PRE vs POST tests p ≤ 0.02) whereas the body weight exercises did not (all p > 0.14). Conclusions: These results indicate that WB-EMS intervention constituted a vigorous physical activity. The WB-EMS required also a greater metabolic demand and greater muscle fatigue than a traditional body weight circuit training. Thus, WB-EMS can be considered as an alternative training tool for physically active individuals. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Italia.

Oxygen consumption and muscle fatigue induced by whole-body electromyostimulation compared to equal-duration body weight circuit training

Boccia, Gennaro
;
Fornasiero, Alessandro;Savoldelli, Aldo;Bortolan, Lorenzo;Schena, Federico;Pellegrini, Barbara
2017-01-01

Abstract

Background: Whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) has become increasingly popular under the promise to offer a time-saving and effective exercise protocols. Few studies estimating the training intervention intensity of WB-EMS are available in the literature. Aim: The aim of this study was first to estimate the metabolic demand and muscle fatigue induced by a training session with WB-EMS, and second to compare them to a control intervention. Methods: Ten young participants performed two training sessions: an experimental condition constituted by five exercises with superimposed WB-EMS and a control condition constituted by five body weight exercises. Both sessions lasted 15 min and were based on isometric intermittent contraction (6 of contraction interspersed by 4 s of rest). Muscle fatigue was assessed by determining the force decrease in the following tests: isometric mid-thigh pull; plyometric push-up; counter-movement jump. Oxygen consumption and energy expenditure were recorded by measuring respiratory gases exchange to quantify the metabolic demand of the exercises. Results: The WB-EMS intervention required greater volume of oxygen consumed (WB-EMS 1584 ± 251 ml/min; control 1465 ± 216 ml/min, p = 0.006) and energy expenditure (WB-EMS 470 ± 71 kcal/h; control 438 ± 61 kcal/h, p = 0.013) than in control intervention. Overall, the WB-EMS training induced muscle fatigue (all PRE vs POST tests p ≤ 0.02) whereas the body weight exercises did not (all p > 0.14). Conclusions: These results indicate that WB-EMS intervention constituted a vigorous physical activity. The WB-EMS required also a greater metabolic demand and greater muscle fatigue than a traditional body weight circuit training. Thus, WB-EMS can be considered as an alternative training tool for physically active individuals. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Italia.
counter-movement jump; energy expenditure; isometric mid-thigh pull; muscle fatigue; oxygen consumption; plyometric push-up
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/971762
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