Purpose: Falls are common events in institutionalized elderly. Recent evidence suggests that several risk factors (FRFs) may be related to these falls. The aim of this study was to elucidate if some demographic and clinical factors are associated with the risk of falls in institutionalized elderly. The role of adapted physical activity (APA) in the risk of falls was also assessed. Methods: With a Kaplan–Meier statistical model, the mean survivor time (MST) to a fall event was recorded for 6 months in 128 new-admitted patients to nursing home. Demographic factors such as sex, age, stature, body mass or other FRFs such as fall recidivism, gait and balance performance, cognitive impairment, activity of daily living (ADL) levels, Parkinson’s disease, utilization of gait assistant devices, and the employment of a program of APA were considered potential co-variants. Results: Thirty patients experienced a fall during the observation period (6 months) with an overall MST of 154.8 ± 4.6 (range 2–167) days. Moreover, history of previous fallen, reduced gait capacity, poor cognitive function, limited performance in the ADL, and Parkinson’s disease were associated with a reduced MST to a fall event. While at contrary, the employment of the APA significantly reduced the fall-risk. Conclusions: Our results suggest the effectiveness of an APA program for the prevention of falling in institutionalized elderly. Moreover, new-admitted patients to nursing homes with a history of previous fallen, reduced gait capacity, poor cognitive function, limited performance in the ADL, and Parkinson’s disease are associated with an increased risk of fallen. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Italia.

Fall-risk factors in hospitalized elderly: the role of adapted physical activity

Venturelli, Massimo
Conceptualization
2016-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: Falls are common events in institutionalized elderly. Recent evidence suggests that several risk factors (FRFs) may be related to these falls. The aim of this study was to elucidate if some demographic and clinical factors are associated with the risk of falls in institutionalized elderly. The role of adapted physical activity (APA) in the risk of falls was also assessed. Methods: With a Kaplan–Meier statistical model, the mean survivor time (MST) to a fall event was recorded for 6 months in 128 new-admitted patients to nursing home. Demographic factors such as sex, age, stature, body mass or other FRFs such as fall recidivism, gait and balance performance, cognitive impairment, activity of daily living (ADL) levels, Parkinson’s disease, utilization of gait assistant devices, and the employment of a program of APA were considered potential co-variants. Results: Thirty patients experienced a fall during the observation period (6 months) with an overall MST of 154.8 ± 4.6 (range 2–167) days. Moreover, history of previous fallen, reduced gait capacity, poor cognitive function, limited performance in the ADL, and Parkinson’s disease were associated with a reduced MST to a fall event. While at contrary, the employment of the APA significantly reduced the fall-risk. Conclusions: Our results suggest the effectiveness of an APA program for the prevention of falling in institutionalized elderly. Moreover, new-admitted patients to nursing homes with a history of previous fallen, reduced gait capacity, poor cognitive function, limited performance in the ADL, and Parkinson’s disease are associated with an increased risk of fallen. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Italia.
adapted physical activity; ageing; risk factors; falls
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/969935
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