Introduction Despite the large routine use of biologic drugs in psoriasis treatment, the majority of studies do not take into consideration dose-adjustment practice in ‘real-life’ dermatological setting. In routine clinical practice, the disease management may include a large number of conditions requiring non-standard dosage regimens, including dose escalation, dose reduction and/or off-label treatment interruption. Objective The ONDA (Outcome of non-standard dosing regimen in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis) study aim was to retrospectively analyse dose-adjustment strategies among biologic therapies for psoriasis in dermatological practice during a 3-year period. Results This retrospective, observational, multicentre study was carried out in 350 patients (68% male, 32% female) affected by plaque-type psoriasis (Pso) with a coexistence of psoriatic arthritis in 164 patients (46.9%). At baseline mean PASI score was 14.9 (SD 7.2). Dose adjustment was demonstrated to be a common practice with 70/350 patients (20%) who needed a dose variation during the treatment time, in particular a dose increase in 20/70 patients (28.6%) and a dose reduction in 50/70 patients (71.4%). Dose increase was due to inefficacy on Pso parameters in 60% of cases and to inefficacy of PsA parameters in 40% of cases, while dose reduction (or temporary off-label treatment interruption) was due to prolonged remission in 54% of cases, other reason in 18% of cases, patient choice or request in 14% of cases, occurrence of concomitant event in 12% of cases. Conclusion Dose adjustment is a common clinical practice, consisting of frequent dose reduction when a disease prolonged remission is obtained or dose increase to improve efficacy on Pso and PsA disease parameters

Dose adjustment of biologic therapies for psoriasis in dermatological practice: a retrospective study

GISONDI, Paolo;DEL GIGLIO, Micol;DI MERCURIO, Marco;GIROLOMONI, Giampiero
2017-01-01

Abstract

Introduction Despite the large routine use of biologic drugs in psoriasis treatment, the majority of studies do not take into consideration dose-adjustment practice in ‘real-life’ dermatological setting. In routine clinical practice, the disease management may include a large number of conditions requiring non-standard dosage regimens, including dose escalation, dose reduction and/or off-label treatment interruption. Objective The ONDA (Outcome of non-standard dosing regimen in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis) study aim was to retrospectively analyse dose-adjustment strategies among biologic therapies for psoriasis in dermatological practice during a 3-year period. Results This retrospective, observational, multicentre study was carried out in 350 patients (68% male, 32% female) affected by plaque-type psoriasis (Pso) with a coexistence of psoriatic arthritis in 164 patients (46.9%). At baseline mean PASI score was 14.9 (SD 7.2). Dose adjustment was demonstrated to be a common practice with 70/350 patients (20%) who needed a dose variation during the treatment time, in particular a dose increase in 20/70 patients (28.6%) and a dose reduction in 50/70 patients (71.4%). Dose increase was due to inefficacy on Pso parameters in 60% of cases and to inefficacy of PsA parameters in 40% of cases, while dose reduction (or temporary off-label treatment interruption) was due to prolonged remission in 54% of cases, other reason in 18% of cases, patient choice or request in 14% of cases, occurrence of concomitant event in 12% of cases. Conclusion Dose adjustment is a common clinical practice, consisting of frequent dose reduction when a disease prolonged remission is obtained or dose increase to improve efficacy on Pso and PsA disease parameters
biologic therapies, psoriasis, dermatological practice
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/960701
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