Aim – To investigate the association of glycemic control with depression, anxiety, self-efficacy and other diabetes-specific psychological measures in a cohort of adult patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) free of severe chronic diabetes-related complications. Methods – In 172 T2D outpatients consecutively recruited at the Diabetes Center of Verona City Hospital, we performed a standard medical assessment and completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire (MDQ). Results – Age, body mass index (BMI) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were (median [IQR]): 64.0 [58.0-69.0] years, 31.0 [28.0-34.4] kg/m², and 7.3 [6.7-8.0] %, respectively. The overall prevalence of anxiety and depression was 14.5% and 18.6%, respectively. Higher levels of HbA1c were significantly (p<0.001) associated with a number of MDQ dimensions, such as higher perceived interference with daily activities (Spearman’s rho coefficient=0.33), higher perceived diabetes severity (rho=0.28) and lower self-efficacy (rho=-0.27), but not with depression or anxiety. These three variables were also independent predictors of higher HbA1c levels, when entered in a multivariable stepwise-forward regression model that also included age, BMI, diabetes duration and diabetes-specific social support as covariates. Conclusion – Lower self-efficacy and higher diabetes distress were closely associated with poorer glycemic control. No direct association between HbA1c and clinical psychological symptoms was detected. These results highlight that a number of diabetes-specific psychological variables may play a role amidst psychological distress and glycemic control. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relevance of diabetes distress and self-efficacy to the achievement of individual glycemic targets.

Psychological distress, Self-Efficacy and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes

Indelicato, Liliana;DAURIZ, Marco;Santi, Lorenza;NEGRI, Carlo;TARGHER, Giovanni;BONORA, Enzo
2017-01-01

Abstract

Aim – To investigate the association of glycemic control with depression, anxiety, self-efficacy and other diabetes-specific psychological measures in a cohort of adult patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) free of severe chronic diabetes-related complications. Methods – In 172 T2D outpatients consecutively recruited at the Diabetes Center of Verona City Hospital, we performed a standard medical assessment and completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire (MDQ). Results – Age, body mass index (BMI) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were (median [IQR]): 64.0 [58.0-69.0] years, 31.0 [28.0-34.4] kg/m², and 7.3 [6.7-8.0] %, respectively. The overall prevalence of anxiety and depression was 14.5% and 18.6%, respectively. Higher levels of HbA1c were significantly (p<0.001) associated with a number of MDQ dimensions, such as higher perceived interference with daily activities (Spearman’s rho coefficient=0.33), higher perceived diabetes severity (rho=0.28) and lower self-efficacy (rho=-0.27), but not with depression or anxiety. These three variables were also independent predictors of higher HbA1c levels, when entered in a multivariable stepwise-forward regression model that also included age, BMI, diabetes duration and diabetes-specific social support as covariates. Conclusion – Lower self-efficacy and higher diabetes distress were closely associated with poorer glycemic control. No direct association between HbA1c and clinical psychological symptoms was detected. These results highlight that a number of diabetes-specific psychological variables may play a role amidst psychological distress and glycemic control. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relevance of diabetes distress and self-efficacy to the achievement of individual glycemic targets.
Type 2 Diabetes; Self-Efficacy; Glycemic Control; Anxiety; Depression
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/958012
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