Objective: To examine the descending motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in a chronic alcoholic patient with a slight atrophy of the peri-central cortex and compare with that observed in neurologically intact subjects. Methods: EMGs from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle, and descending activity from an electrode implanted in the high cervical epidural space for relief of pain were recorded after TMS of the hand area of motor cortex. A figure-of-8 coil was used to induce either a posterior-anterior (PA) or a latero-medial (LM) flow across the central sulcus. Results: In intact subjects, LM stimulation evoked the earliest volley, which we termed a D wave. This was followed by later, presumed I waves at intervals of about 1.5 ms. At a stimulus intensity of 120% resting threshold (RMT), up to 5 I waves were seen. PA stimulation rarely evoked D waves at intensities up to 120% RMT, but 3 or 4 1 waves were visible in all subjects. The patient had an increased resting threshold, and the descending volleys were dominated by a D wave. I waves were unclear, with two possible small peaks at 5.5 and 7.2 ms. Conclusions: The lack of I waves in the patient was probably due to an impairment of interneuronal circuitry in the context of the brain damage related to chronic alcohol abuse, and is consistent with a trans-synaptic origin of the I waves in humans. The intact D wave is consistent with the assumption that the D wave represents direct stimulation of the axons of intact corticospinal neurotics in the subcortical white matter. The patient's increased RMT reflects the fact that usually multiple descending volleys are needed to discharge resting spinal motoneurones. (C) 2004 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Objective: To examine the descending motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in a chronic alcoholic patient with a slight atrophy of the peri-central cortex and compare with that observed in neurologically intact subjects. Methods: EMGs from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle, and descending activity from an electrode implanted in the high cervical epidural space for relief of pain were recorded after TMS of the hand area of motor cortex. A figure-of-8 coil was used to induce either a posterior-anterior (PA) or a latero-medial (LM) flow across the central sulcus. Results: In intact subjects, LM stimulation evoked the earliest volley, which we termed a D wave. This was followed by later, presumed I waves at intervals of about 1.5 ms. At a stimulus intensity of 120% resting threshold (RMT), up to 5 I waves were seen. PA stimulation rarely evoked D waves at intensities up to 120% RMT, but 3 or 4 I waves were visible in all subjects. The patient had an increased resting threshold, and the descending volleys were dominated by a D wave. I waves were unclear, with two possible small peaks at 5.5 and 7.2 ms. Conclusions: The lack of I waves in the patient was probably due to an impairment of interneuronal circuitry in the context of the brain damage related to chronic alcohol abuse, and is consistent with a trans-synaptic origin of the I waves in humans. The intact D wave is consistent with the assumption that the D wave represents direct stimulation of the axons of intact corticospinal neurones in the subcortical white matter. The patient's increased RMT reflects the fact that usually multiple descending volleys are needed to discharge resting spinal motoneurones. © 2004 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Direct recording of the output of the motor cortex produced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in a patient with cerebral cortex atrophy

MEGLIO, Mario;
2004

Abstract

Objective: To examine the descending motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in a chronic alcoholic patient with a slight atrophy of the peri-central cortex and compare with that observed in neurologically intact subjects. Methods: EMGs from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle, and descending activity from an electrode implanted in the high cervical epidural space for relief of pain were recorded after TMS of the hand area of motor cortex. A figure-of-8 coil was used to induce either a posterior-anterior (PA) or a latero-medial (LM) flow across the central sulcus. Results: In intact subjects, LM stimulation evoked the earliest volley, which we termed a D wave. This was followed by later, presumed I waves at intervals of about 1.5 ms. At a stimulus intensity of 120% resting threshold (RMT), up to 5 I waves were seen. PA stimulation rarely evoked D waves at intensities up to 120% RMT, but 3 or 4 1 waves were visible in all subjects. The patient had an increased resting threshold, and the descending volleys were dominated by a D wave. I waves were unclear, with two possible small peaks at 5.5 and 7.2 ms. Conclusions: The lack of I waves in the patient was probably due to an impairment of interneuronal circuitry in the context of the brain damage related to chronic alcohol abuse, and is consistent with a trans-synaptic origin of the I waves in humans. The intact D wave is consistent with the assumption that the D wave represents direct stimulation of the axons of intact corticospinal neurotics in the subcortical white matter. The patient's increased RMT reflects the fact that usually multiple descending volleys are needed to discharge resting spinal motoneurones. (C) 2004 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Alcohol; Cerebral cortex atrophy; Motor cortex; Transcranial brain stimulation; Transcranial magnetic stimulation;
Objective: To examine the descending motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in a chronic alcoholic patient with a slight atrophy of the peri-central cortex and compare with that observed in neurologically intact subjects. Methods: EMGs from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle, and descending activity from an electrode implanted in the high cervical epidural space for relief of pain were recorded after TMS of the hand area of motor cortex. A figure-of-8 coil was used to induce either a posterior-anterior (PA) or a latero-medial (LM) flow across the central sulcus. Results: In intact subjects, LM stimulation evoked the earliest volley, which we termed a D wave. This was followed by later, presumed I waves at intervals of about 1.5 ms. At a stimulus intensity of 120% resting threshold (RMT), up to 5 I waves were seen. PA stimulation rarely evoked D waves at intensities up to 120% RMT, but 3 or 4 I waves were visible in all subjects. The patient had an increased resting threshold, and the descending volleys were dominated by a D wave. I waves were unclear, with two possible small peaks at 5.5 and 7.2 ms. Conclusions: The lack of I waves in the patient was probably due to an impairment of interneuronal circuitry in the context of the brain damage related to chronic alcohol abuse, and is consistent with a trans-synaptic origin of the I waves in humans. The intact D wave is consistent with the assumption that the D wave represents direct stimulation of the axons of intact corticospinal neurones in the subcortical white matter. The patient's increased RMT reflects the fact that usually multiple descending volleys are needed to discharge resting spinal motoneurones. © 2004 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/947518
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