Background: MA is an important indicator of physiological development in women and MA delayed was been associated with chronic illness. Objective: to investigate predictors and factors at diagnosis that influence MA in chronic diseases. Methods: A cohort of 391 Italian girls aged 11-24 years with chronic illness was assessed. 245 girls (107 with T1DM, 75 with CD, 12 with both T1DM and CD, 51 with GDH) were included. We investigate their anthropometric data, metabolic status, diagnosis parameters, presence of irregular menses and we compared their MA with healthy italian girls MA. Results: mean MA for all girls included is 12.7 ± 1.2 years. MA in different groups was: 12.52 years for girls with T1DM, 12.27 years for girls with CD, 13.52 years in girls with both T1DM and CD, 13.38 years in girls with GHD. In T1DM group a strong positive correlation is also found between menarcheal glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and mean HbA1c (p<0.0001, R 0.54). 36.2% of patients with T1DM or CD or both present menses abnormalities. Girls with irregular menses showed MA significantly delayed than girls with regular cycles. Conclusions: No differences in MA were observed in Italian girls with CD and T1DM compared to Italian healthy population. Instead patients with GHD and girls with both CD and T1DM showed delayed MA compared to healthy population and to girls with only CD or T1DM. Our data on menarcheal HbA1c and mean HbA1c showed that achieve a good metabolic status can let girls with T1DM reach pubertal stages as healthy peers. Data about menses abnormalities probably show that chronic diseases can predispose young adult age menses abnormalities as delayed puberty although it remains to understand the pathophysiological mechanism.

Age at Menarche (MA) in chronic diseases: celiac disease (CD), insulin-dependent diabetes (T1DM) and growth hormone deficiency (GHD).

SORDELLI, Silvia;BANZATO, Claudia;CAVARZERE, Paolo;Piona, Claudia;BENINI, Luigi;ANTONIAZZI, Franco;MAFFEIS, Claudio;GAUDINO, Rossella
2013-01-01

Abstract

Background: MA is an important indicator of physiological development in women and MA delayed was been associated with chronic illness. Objective: to investigate predictors and factors at diagnosis that influence MA in chronic diseases. Methods: A cohort of 391 Italian girls aged 11-24 years with chronic illness was assessed. 245 girls (107 with T1DM, 75 with CD, 12 with both T1DM and CD, 51 with GDH) were included. We investigate their anthropometric data, metabolic status, diagnosis parameters, presence of irregular menses and we compared their MA with healthy italian girls MA. Results: mean MA for all girls included is 12.7 ± 1.2 years. MA in different groups was: 12.52 years for girls with T1DM, 12.27 years for girls with CD, 13.52 years in girls with both T1DM and CD, 13.38 years in girls with GHD. In T1DM group a strong positive correlation is also found between menarcheal glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and mean HbA1c (p<0.0001, R 0.54). 36.2% of patients with T1DM or CD or both present menses abnormalities. Girls with irregular menses showed MA significantly delayed than girls with regular cycles. Conclusions: No differences in MA were observed in Italian girls with CD and T1DM compared to Italian healthy population. Instead patients with GHD and girls with both CD and T1DM showed delayed MA compared to healthy population and to girls with only CD or T1DM. Our data on menarcheal HbA1c and mean HbA1c showed that achieve a good metabolic status can let girls with T1DM reach pubertal stages as healthy peers. Data about menses abnormalities probably show that chronic diseases can predispose young adult age menses abnormalities as delayed puberty although it remains to understand the pathophysiological mechanism.
Age at Menarche (MA); chronic diseases
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/878230
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