OBJECTIVE: We conducted a phase I-II study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity and activity of weekly docetaxel administration in pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients. METHODS: In phase I, cohorts of 3 women with pretreated metastatic breast cancer were treated with a 1-hour infusion of docetaxelat 30, 35, 40 mg/m2/week after premedication with two doses of dexamethazone 8 mg 12 h apart. Subsequently, a cohort of 28 women was treated at the MTD for 24 consecutive weeks in a phase II setting and was assessed for toxicity and activity. RESULTS: Three patients were treated at each of the first two dose levels; 9 patients were treated at the 3rd level (40 mg/m2/week). Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were experienced at that level by 2/6 patients of the first two accrued groups and in 2/3 patients of the 3rd (confirmation) group, thus establishing the subsequent phase II dose at 35 mg/m2/week. Two out of 28 evaluable patients (7.1%, 95% CI 0-16.7) showed complete responses, whereas 8 (28.6%, 95% CI 11.8-45.3) showed partial responses, and an objective response rate of 35.7% (95% confidence interval, CI 18-53.5%). In addition, 8 patients (28.6%) had stable disease. The median time to progression and overall survival were 5 (range 1-15) and 15 months (95% CI 7-23), respectively. One patient experienced 1 episode of grade 3 neutropenia. Severe asthenia was the main reason for interruption of chemotherapy (10 patients, 35.5%). CONCLUSIONS: In pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients, the sustained weekly administration of docetaxel, even though it demonstrated an activity similar to a 3-weekly schedule could not be maintained for the planned 24 weeks due to the progressive emergence of nonhematological side effects that approached DLTs.

Weekly Docetaxel In Pretreated Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: A Phase I-II Study

Bria, Emilio;Milella M;
2005-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We conducted a phase I-II study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity and activity of weekly docetaxel administration in pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients. METHODS: In phase I, cohorts of 3 women with pretreated metastatic breast cancer were treated with a 1-hour infusion of docetaxelat 30, 35, 40 mg/m2/week after premedication with two doses of dexamethazone 8 mg 12 h apart. Subsequently, a cohort of 28 women was treated at the MTD for 24 consecutive weeks in a phase II setting and was assessed for toxicity and activity. RESULTS: Three patients were treated at each of the first two dose levels; 9 patients were treated at the 3rd level (40 mg/m2/week). Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were experienced at that level by 2/6 patients of the first two accrued groups and in 2/3 patients of the 3rd (confirmation) group, thus establishing the subsequent phase II dose at 35 mg/m2/week. Two out of 28 evaluable patients (7.1%, 95% CI 0-16.7) showed complete responses, whereas 8 (28.6%, 95% CI 11.8-45.3) showed partial responses, and an objective response rate of 35.7% (95% confidence interval, CI 18-53.5%). In addition, 8 patients (28.6%) had stable disease. The median time to progression and overall survival were 5 (range 1-15) and 15 months (95% CI 7-23), respectively. One patient experienced 1 episode of grade 3 neutropenia. Severe asthenia was the main reason for interruption of chemotherapy (10 patients, 35.5%). CONCLUSIONS: In pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients, the sustained weekly administration of docetaxel, even though it demonstrated an activity similar to a 3-weekly schedule could not be maintained for the planned 24 weeks due to the progressive emergence of nonhematological side effects that approached DLTs.
Weekly; docetaxel; breast cancer
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/873781
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