Renal metabolism of C-peptide was studied in nine nondiabetic nonobese patients with normal renal function by the arterial-venous difference technique before and after the oral administration of an amino acid mixture simulating an animal protein meal. In the basal state, the kidney removed 25.7 +/- 7.5% (+/- SD) of the arterial plasma C-peptide. Renal uptake was approximately 7-fold greater than urinary excretion, and thus, more than 85% of the amount extracted was metabolized by the kidney. Renal C-peptide clearance was very high and approximated the glomerular filtration rate, whereas urinary C-peptide clearance was only 14% of its renal clearance. Shortly after amino acid ingestion, arterial C-peptide levels increased by 107%, and C-peptide renal fractional extraction, uptake, and net metabolism also increased markedly (67%, 278%, and 328%, respectively); urinary clearance and excretion did not change. Renal clearance became 2-fold greater than the glomerular filtration rate, indicating that in this phase the kidney removed substantial amounts of C-peptide from peritubular blood as well as by filtration. Both renal uptake and urinary excretion of C-peptide were related to its arterial levels (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.05, respectively), but renal uptake increased much more than urinary excretion for each increment in arterial C-peptide levels. These results indicate that renal C-peptide metabolism is considerable in the postabsorptive state and is even more marked during the postprandial period. The kidney, therefore, plays a key role in both the regulation of circulating plasma levels and the metabolic clearance of C-peptide.

Renal metabolism of C-peptide in man

BONORA, Enzo;
1987-01-01

Abstract

Renal metabolism of C-peptide was studied in nine nondiabetic nonobese patients with normal renal function by the arterial-venous difference technique before and after the oral administration of an amino acid mixture simulating an animal protein meal. In the basal state, the kidney removed 25.7 +/- 7.5% (+/- SD) of the arterial plasma C-peptide. Renal uptake was approximately 7-fold greater than urinary excretion, and thus, more than 85% of the amount extracted was metabolized by the kidney. Renal C-peptide clearance was very high and approximated the glomerular filtration rate, whereas urinary C-peptide clearance was only 14% of its renal clearance. Shortly after amino acid ingestion, arterial C-peptide levels increased by 107%, and C-peptide renal fractional extraction, uptake, and net metabolism also increased markedly (67%, 278%, and 328%, respectively); urinary clearance and excretion did not change. Renal clearance became 2-fold greater than the glomerular filtration rate, indicating that in this phase the kidney removed substantial amounts of C-peptide from peritubular blood as well as by filtration. Both renal uptake and urinary excretion of C-peptide were related to its arterial levels (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.05, respectively), but renal uptake increased much more than urinary excretion for each increment in arterial C-peptide levels. These results indicate that renal C-peptide metabolism is considerable in the postabsorptive state and is even more marked during the postprandial period. The kidney, therefore, plays a key role in both the regulation of circulating plasma levels and the metabolic clearance of C-peptide.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/7261
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