Shuttle runs can be used to study the physiological responses in sports (such as basketball) characterized by sprints (accelerations/decelerations) and changes of direction. Purpose: To determine the energy cost (C) of shuttle runs with different turning angles and over different distances (with different acceleration/deceleration patterns). Methods: Nine basketball players were asked to complete 6 intermittent tests over different distances (5, 10, 25 m) and with different changes of direction (180° at 5 and 25 m; 0°, 45°, 90°, and 180° at 10 m) at maximal speed (v ≈ 4.5 m/s), each composed by 10 shuttle runs of 10-s duration and 30-s recovery; during these runs oxygen uptake (VO2), blood lactate (Lab), and C were determined. Results: For a given shuttle distance (10 m) no major differences where observed in VO2 (~33 mL · min–1 · kg–1), Lab (~3.75 mM), and C (~21.2 J · m–1 · kg–1) when the shuttle runs were performed with different turning angles. For a given turning angle (180°), VO2 and Lab were found to increase with the distance covered (VO2 from 26 to 35 mL · min–1 · kg–1; Lab from 0.7 to 7.6 mM) while C was found to decrease with it (from 29.9 to 10.6 J · m–1 · kg–1); the relationship between C and d (m) is well described by C = 92.99 × d0.656, R2 = .971. Conclusions: The metabolic demands of shuttle tests run at maximal speeds can be estimated based on the running distance, while the turning angle plays a minor role in determining C.

Energetics of shuttle runs: the effects of distance and change of direction.

ZAMPARO, Paola;BEATO, MARCO;
2014-01-01

Abstract

Shuttle runs can be used to study the physiological responses in sports (such as basketball) characterized by sprints (accelerations/decelerations) and changes of direction. Purpose: To determine the energy cost (C) of shuttle runs with different turning angles and over different distances (with different acceleration/deceleration patterns). Methods: Nine basketball players were asked to complete 6 intermittent tests over different distances (5, 10, 25 m) and with different changes of direction (180° at 5 and 25 m; 0°, 45°, 90°, and 180° at 10 m) at maximal speed (v ≈ 4.5 m/s), each composed by 10 shuttle runs of 10-s duration and 30-s recovery; during these runs oxygen uptake (VO2), blood lactate (Lab), and C were determined. Results: For a given shuttle distance (10 m) no major differences where observed in VO2 (~33 mL · min–1 · kg–1), Lab (~3.75 mM), and C (~21.2 J · m–1 · kg–1) when the shuttle runs were performed with different turning angles. For a given turning angle (180°), VO2 and Lab were found to increase with the distance covered (VO2 from 26 to 35 mL · min–1 · kg–1; Lab from 0.7 to 7.6 mM) while C was found to decrease with it (from 29.9 to 10.6 J · m–1 · kg–1); the relationship between C and d (m) is well described by C = 92.99 × d0.656, R2 = .971. Conclusions: The metabolic demands of shuttle tests run at maximal speeds can be estimated based on the running distance, while the turning angle plays a minor role in determining C.
basketball; shuttle test; running economy; intermittent exercise
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/703560
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