Between November 1985 and November 1991, 180 patients underwent heart transplantation at our institution; 55 of these patients (31%) were over 55 years of age. Eighteen patients (10%) received hearts from donors who were over 40 years of age (mean age, 47 years; range, 40 to 55 years); (group 1); 37 hearts (21%) were from donors who were under 40 years of age (mean age, 23 years; range, 8 to 38 years). Mean recipient age was 59 years (range, 55 to 64 years) and 57 years (range, 55 to 68 years) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The main indication for transplantation was ischemic heart disease in group 1 and dilated cardiomyopathy in group 2. Perioperative mortality and intensive care assistance were similar in the two groups. Survival was 88% versus 84% at 1 year and 81% versus 80% at 4 years in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Although infections were more frequent in group 1 (0.27 versus 0.11 episode/patient), the incidence of acute rejection was comparable in the two groups (1.50 versus 1.65 episode/patient). Angiographic and echocardiographic controls showed normal graft function up to 4 years, with low incidence of chronic rejection in both groups. We conclude that heart transplantation in patients over 55 years of age with donors over 40 years of age offers excellent short-term and mid-term results. The consideration of older donors makes heart transplantation a valid therapeutic option for selected patients in the sixth and seventh decade of life, in spite of chronic donor shortage.

Clinical results of heart transplantation in recipients over 55 years of age with donors over 40 years of age

LUCIANI, GIOVANNI BATTISTA;FAGGIAN, Giuseppe;MAZZUCCO, Alessandro
1992

Abstract

Between November 1985 and November 1991, 180 patients underwent heart transplantation at our institution; 55 of these patients (31%) were over 55 years of age. Eighteen patients (10%) received hearts from donors who were over 40 years of age (mean age, 47 years; range, 40 to 55 years); (group 1); 37 hearts (21%) were from donors who were under 40 years of age (mean age, 23 years; range, 8 to 38 years). Mean recipient age was 59 years (range, 55 to 64 years) and 57 years (range, 55 to 68 years) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The main indication for transplantation was ischemic heart disease in group 1 and dilated cardiomyopathy in group 2. Perioperative mortality and intensive care assistance were similar in the two groups. Survival was 88% versus 84% at 1 year and 81% versus 80% at 4 years in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Although infections were more frequent in group 1 (0.27 versus 0.11 episode/patient), the incidence of acute rejection was comparable in the two groups (1.50 versus 1.65 episode/patient). Angiographic and echocardiographic controls showed normal graft function up to 4 years, with low incidence of chronic rejection in both groups. We conclude that heart transplantation in patients over 55 years of age with donors over 40 years of age offers excellent short-term and mid-term results. The consideration of older donors makes heart transplantation a valid therapeutic option for selected patients in the sixth and seventh decade of life, in spite of chronic donor shortage.
heart transplantation, older recipients, older donors
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/6708
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