Prostasin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease, activates the epithelial sodium (Na) channel (ENaC), and prostasin is released in extracellular fluids, including urine. Previous data have suggested a direct association between urinary prostasin and the activation of an aldosterone-driven pathway, but a quantitative association has never been demonstrated in normotensive subjects. Similarly, physiological relationships with natriuresis or possible gender- or female hormone-related changes in urinary prostasin concentrations have never been investigated. We measured urinary prostasin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 43 healthy normotensive subjects of similar age presenting different urinary Na levels and in 15 women during the menstrual cycle and after oral estro-progestinic contraceptive (OC) therapy. Exosomal urinary prostasin was also estimated by western blotting of samples from six healthy subjects twice during the morning. Urinary prostasin presented a wide range of values (from 0.5 to 18.9 nM) without gender differences. It was positively correlated with the aldosterone to renin ratio (ARR) but not with circulating aldosterone or renin individually. Urinary prostasin was directly correlated with U-Na levels (up to 200 nmol Na), whereas it decreased for higher Na concentrations. In women, no significant changes of prostasin concentration were observed during menstrual phases. After OC therapy, prostasin increased (from 2.37±1.27 to 4.85±5.28 nM), although the increase was not statistically different (P=0.07). Prostasin was detectable in urinary exosomes and displayed a pattern similar to urinary prostasin in relation to urinary Na. In conclusion, urinary prostasin correlates with the ARR, and it is physiologically modulated by natriuresis in normotensive individuals.

Urinary prostasin in normotensive individuals: correlation with the aldosterone to renin ratio and urinary sodium.

OLIVIERI, Oliviero;CHIECCHI, Laura;PIZZOLO, Francesca;Castagna A;RAFFAELLI, Ricciarda;GUNASEKARAN, Muthukumar;GUARINI, Patrizia;SALVAGNO, GIAN LUCA;
2013

Abstract

Prostasin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease, activates the epithelial sodium (Na) channel (ENaC), and prostasin is released in extracellular fluids, including urine. Previous data have suggested a direct association between urinary prostasin and the activation of an aldosterone-driven pathway, but a quantitative association has never been demonstrated in normotensive subjects. Similarly, physiological relationships with natriuresis or possible gender- or female hormone-related changes in urinary prostasin concentrations have never been investigated. We measured urinary prostasin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 43 healthy normotensive subjects of similar age presenting different urinary Na levels and in 15 women during the menstrual cycle and after oral estro-progestinic contraceptive (OC) therapy. Exosomal urinary prostasin was also estimated by western blotting of samples from six healthy subjects twice during the morning. Urinary prostasin presented a wide range of values (from 0.5 to 18.9 nM) without gender differences. It was positively correlated with the aldosterone to renin ratio (ARR) but not with circulating aldosterone or renin individually. Urinary prostasin was directly correlated with U-Na levels (up to 200 nmol Na), whereas it decreased for higher Na concentrations. In women, no significant changes of prostasin concentration were observed during menstrual phases. After OC therapy, prostasin increased (from 2.37±1.27 to 4.85±5.28 nM), although the increase was not statistically different (P=0.07). Prostasin was detectable in urinary exosomes and displayed a pattern similar to urinary prostasin in relation to urinary Na. In conclusion, urinary prostasin correlates with the ARR, and it is physiologically modulated by natriuresis in normotensive individuals.
prostasin; ENaC; hypertension; aldosterone-to-renin ratio, hypertension, primary hyperaldosteronism, renal artery disease; Aldosterone
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/608964
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