Recent research from accident and emergency medicine illustrates how, for randomised trials of routinely administered treatments in emergency care, requiring informed consent can cause delay in treatment administration, and sometimes delay can be lethal. This situation is equally applicable to psychiatric emergency care, where clinicians often have to manage aggressive and disruptive behaviours requiring immediate interventions to be done. This scenario calls those designing trials or acting on ethics committees to face important issues so people who are subject to coercive care can have treatments that are fully and fairly tested.

'Consent rituals' in evaluation of coercive care

PURGATO, Marianna
;
2013

Abstract

Recent research from accident and emergency medicine illustrates how, for randomised trials of routinely administered treatments in emergency care, requiring informed consent can cause delay in treatment administration, and sometimes delay can be lethal. This situation is equally applicable to psychiatric emergency care, where clinicians often have to manage aggressive and disruptive behaviours requiring immediate interventions to be done. This scenario calls those designing trials or acting on ethics committees to face important issues so people who are subject to coercive care can have treatments that are fully and fairly tested.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/591777
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