Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of premature death in the developed world. Advice and assistance by physicians help smokers quit, but little attention has been paid to the topic of tobacco dependence in the curricula of Italian medical schools. Consequently, few physicians follow the clinical practice guidelines for treating dependence.METHODS:This study was conducted on 439 students at 4 Italian medical schools in 2010. Students were asked to complete a 60-item questionnaire. Two scores were computed: Score 1 assessed knowledge of the epidemiology of smoking, risks associated with smoking, and benefits of cessation. Score 2 assessed knowledge of tobacco dependence treatment guidelines and the effectiveness of treatments. A score of less than 60% indicated insufficient knowledge.RESULTS:Medical students had limited knowledge of the epidemiology of smoking, attributable morbidity and mortality, and the benefits of cessation. This limited knowledge was reflected by the finding that 70% of students had a total Score 1 less than 60% of available points. Knowledge of clinical guidelines, perceived competence in counseling smokers, and treatment of addiction was also insufficient, as 76% of students achieved a total Score 2 of less than 60%.CONCLUSIONS:Our data demonstrate that Italian medical students have limited knowledge about tobacco dependence, how to treat it, and the critical role of the physician in promoting cessation. Taken together with research from other countries, these findings suggest that medical schools do not offer adequate training in tobacco dependence and provide a rationale for modifying the core curriculum to include more information on tobacco dependence treatment.

Cigarette smoking knowledge and perceptions among students in four Italian medical schools

CHIAMULERA, Cristiano;
2012

Abstract

Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of premature death in the developed world. Advice and assistance by physicians help smokers quit, but little attention has been paid to the topic of tobacco dependence in the curricula of Italian medical schools. Consequently, few physicians follow the clinical practice guidelines for treating dependence.METHODS:This study was conducted on 439 students at 4 Italian medical schools in 2010. Students were asked to complete a 60-item questionnaire. Two scores were computed: Score 1 assessed knowledge of the epidemiology of smoking, risks associated with smoking, and benefits of cessation. Score 2 assessed knowledge of tobacco dependence treatment guidelines and the effectiveness of treatments. A score of less than 60% indicated insufficient knowledge.RESULTS:Medical students had limited knowledge of the epidemiology of smoking, attributable morbidity and mortality, and the benefits of cessation. This limited knowledge was reflected by the finding that 70% of students had a total Score 1 less than 60% of available points. Knowledge of clinical guidelines, perceived competence in counseling smokers, and treatment of addiction was also insufficient, as 76% of students achieved a total Score 2 of less than 60%.CONCLUSIONS:Our data demonstrate that Italian medical students have limited knowledge about tobacco dependence, how to treat it, and the critical role of the physician in promoting cessation. Taken together with research from other countries, these findings suggest that medical schools do not offer adequate training in tobacco dependence and provide a rationale for modifying the core curriculum to include more information on tobacco dependence treatment.
tobacco; smoking; education; medical school; knowledge
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/511951
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