It has been shown that humans are able to recognise their own movement. While visual cues have been amply studied, the contribution of auditory cues is not clear. Our aim was to investigate the role of temporal auditory cues in the identification of one’s own or others’ performance in a complex movement—a golf swing. We investigated whether golfers are able to discriminate between the sounds associated with their own swings and other golfers’ swings, by using the relative timing and the overall duration of the movement. The sounds produced by the participants performing 65 m shots have been recorded and used to create the stimuli. The experimental conditions were: participants’ swing sounds and the sounds of other golfers having equal both relative timing and overall duration, equal relative timing but different overall duration, different relative timing but equal overall duration, and both different relative timing and overall duration. The task of the participants was to say whether each sound corresponded or did not correspond to their own swing. Results show that golfers are able to recognise their own movements, but they also recognise as their own the sound produced by other athletes having equal both relative timing and overall duration.

Recognizing one's own motor actions through sound: The role of temporal factors

GALMONTE, Alessandra;
2012

Abstract

It has been shown that humans are able to recognise their own movement. While visual cues have been amply studied, the contribution of auditory cues is not clear. Our aim was to investigate the role of temporal auditory cues in the identification of one’s own or others’ performance in a complex movement—a golf swing. We investigated whether golfers are able to discriminate between the sounds associated with their own swings and other golfers’ swings, by using the relative timing and the overall duration of the movement. The sounds produced by the participants performing 65 m shots have been recorded and used to create the stimuli. The experimental conditions were: participants’ swing sounds and the sounds of other golfers having equal both relative timing and overall duration, equal relative timing but different overall duration, different relative timing but equal overall duration, and both different relative timing and overall duration. The task of the participants was to say whether each sound corresponded or did not correspond to their own swing. Results show that golfers are able to recognise their own movements, but they also recognise as their own the sound produced by other athletes having equal both relative timing and overall duration.
auditory perception; sound recognition; performer identification; temporal processing; relative timing; overall duration
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/484953
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