Background. Providing care and support to individuals with complex mental health needs and disabilities is highly stressful. However, relatively little research has focussed on the emotional, cognitive, and physical consequences of providing mental health care. Aims. The aim of this study is to assess quality of life (as measured by Burnout (BO), Compassion Fatigue (CF) and Compassion Satisfaction (CS)) among staff at the four community-based mental health services in Verona, Italy. Methods. All mental health professionals were asked to complete anonymously the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL III), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12); and a socio demographic questionnaire. Overall, 260 of the 311 staff completed the questionnaires (a response rate of 84%). Descriptive and multivariate analysis were performed. Results. Distress increased the BO score by 3.1 points and predicted a 57% increase in the CF score. A higher score on the CF was also associated with female (11% increase), a higher educational level, a certificate of professional qualification or a high school diploma (26% increase), professionals with a fixed-term contract (IRR=1.24), while those with a part-time job scored lower (IRR=0.83). People who experienced one negative life event showed a higher score on the CF (IRR=1.16). Conclusions. CF seems to be more sensitive than either BO or distress to several factors, some of which protect from BO or distress while expose professionals to CF. Health managers and team leaders should pay particular attention to CF as it could be a precursor to more severe detrimental effects on staff work experience. If BO and distress can be reduced, then this could have a positive effect on the quality of care provided by the mental health teams by reducing absenteeism, poorer health, suboptimal care practices, medical errors by physicians, lower satisfaction in patients, and longer post discharge rate recovery, all of which are hypotheses to be addressed by future research.

Burnout, compassion fatigue, and compassion satisfaction among staff in community-based mental health services

ROSSI, Alberto;CETRANO, Gaia;RABBI, Laura;DONISI, Valeria;GRIGOLETTI, Laura;TANSELLA, Michele;AMADDEO, Francesco
2012

Abstract

Background. Providing care and support to individuals with complex mental health needs and disabilities is highly stressful. However, relatively little research has focussed on the emotional, cognitive, and physical consequences of providing mental health care. Aims. The aim of this study is to assess quality of life (as measured by Burnout (BO), Compassion Fatigue (CF) and Compassion Satisfaction (CS)) among staff at the four community-based mental health services in Verona, Italy. Methods. All mental health professionals were asked to complete anonymously the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL III), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12); and a socio demographic questionnaire. Overall, 260 of the 311 staff completed the questionnaires (a response rate of 84%). Descriptive and multivariate analysis were performed. Results. Distress increased the BO score by 3.1 points and predicted a 57% increase in the CF score. A higher score on the CF was also associated with female (11% increase), a higher educational level, a certificate of professional qualification or a high school diploma (26% increase), professionals with a fixed-term contract (IRR=1.24), while those with a part-time job scored lower (IRR=0.83). People who experienced one negative life event showed a higher score on the CF (IRR=1.16). Conclusions. CF seems to be more sensitive than either BO or distress to several factors, some of which protect from BO or distress while expose professionals to CF. Health managers and team leaders should pay particular attention to CF as it could be a precursor to more severe detrimental effects on staff work experience. If BO and distress can be reduced, then this could have a positive effect on the quality of care provided by the mental health teams by reducing absenteeism, poorer health, suboptimal care practices, medical errors by physicians, lower satisfaction in patients, and longer post discharge rate recovery, all of which are hypotheses to be addressed by future research.
Burnout; compassion fatigue; compassion satisfaction
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/478788
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