The terrorist attack on the Twin Towers on 11 September 2001 represents a pivotal moment in the dynamic that shapes the explanatory and identification category of "the West" in a crisis of relationship with the "other" that has taken on the tone of a clash of civilizations . Within this scenario, the present work starts from the interpretation of the suicide terrorist as kamikaze to develop a reflection on the construction of the categories we/other in contemporary Western society. The image of the martyr who seeks - through the bomb that will destroy his earthly life - a road to paradise is an archaic paradox that still resonates in us, reduced to a simplified simulacrum, in itself sufficient to explain the absurdity of a gesture so powerfully destructive. The paradise of the suicide bomber assumes the function of a screen that allows us to distance ourselves from the other, confine him to a world totally alien, so different as to be driven by irrationality and inhumanity. In a society that is increasingly immune and saved from the negative, the image of paradise becomes a necessary filter to face the destructive event, avoiding the need to relate with it in an attempt to understand.

Kamikaze's paradise

DE CORDOVA, Federica
2012

Abstract

The terrorist attack on the Twin Towers on 11 September 2001 represents a pivotal moment in the dynamic that shapes the explanatory and identification category of "the West" in a crisis of relationship with the "other" that has taken on the tone of a clash of civilizations . Within this scenario, the present work starts from the interpretation of the suicide terrorist as kamikaze to develop a reflection on the construction of the categories we/other in contemporary Western society. The image of the martyr who seeks - through the bomb that will destroy his earthly life - a road to paradise is an archaic paradox that still resonates in us, reduced to a simplified simulacrum, in itself sufficient to explain the absurdity of a gesture so powerfully destructive. The paradise of the suicide bomber assumes the function of a screen that allows us to distance ourselves from the other, confine him to a world totally alien, so different as to be driven by irrationality and inhumanity. In a society that is increasingly immune and saved from the negative, the image of paradise becomes a necessary filter to face the destructive event, avoiding the need to relate with it in an attempt to understand.
kamikaze; terrorismo; simbolizzazione della violenza; culturalizzazione del martirio.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/422139
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