We studied the in vitro effects of gentamicin and vancomycin alone and in combination added to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement specimens on the bacterial adhesion of multiresistant clinical isolates. The PMMA specimens (discs) loaded with gentamicin (1.9%) or vancomycin (1.9%) or with a combination of the two were placed in Mueller-Hinton Broth inoculated with bacterial strains. After incubation, bacterial growth was determined by optical density (OD(540)) and sub-cultures. The biofilm PMMA-associated dye (crystal violet) was measured. Antibiotic concentrations in broth were determined by fluorescence polarisation immunoassay. All antibiotic-loaded PMMA cement specimens released high, inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin and vancomycin. However, differences in strain growth and adhesion were recorded. The clinical isolates Met-R/Gent-R CoNS showed no adhesion to gentamicin-loaded specimens for 24 h; strains with Gent-Intermediate susceptibility exhibited growth after 48 h but reduced adhesion. Some Gent-R strains exhibited growth and adhesion to antibiotic-loaded specimens similar to controls (plain discs). Only the VRSA strain (Staphylococcus aureus 5/7) and Escherichia coli were able to grow and adhere to vancomycin-loaded specimens after 24 h of incubation. The specimens loaded with the gentamicin + vancomycin combination showed a synergistic inhibitory effect against all tested strains (no bacterial growth). The degree of bacterial adhesion to PMMA cement loaded with gentamicin or vancomycin may be reduced in spite of a normal growth rate and is different for the tested strains. The effect of gentamicin and vancomycin on bacterial growth and adhesion to PMMA bone cement depends on the antibiotic concentrations, on the characteristics of each specific strain and on its ability to produce biofilm and adhere to antibiotic-loaded PMMA bone cement.

Different microbial biofilm formation on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement loaded with gentamicin and vancomycin

BERTAZZONI MINELLI, Elisa;BENINI, Anna
2011

Abstract

We studied the in vitro effects of gentamicin and vancomycin alone and in combination added to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement specimens on the bacterial adhesion of multiresistant clinical isolates. The PMMA specimens (discs) loaded with gentamicin (1.9%) or vancomycin (1.9%) or with a combination of the two were placed in Mueller-Hinton Broth inoculated with bacterial strains. After incubation, bacterial growth was determined by optical density (OD(540)) and sub-cultures. The biofilm PMMA-associated dye (crystal violet) was measured. Antibiotic concentrations in broth were determined by fluorescence polarisation immunoassay. All antibiotic-loaded PMMA cement specimens released high, inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin and vancomycin. However, differences in strain growth and adhesion were recorded. The clinical isolates Met-R/Gent-R CoNS showed no adhesion to gentamicin-loaded specimens for 24 h; strains with Gent-Intermediate susceptibility exhibited growth after 48 h but reduced adhesion. Some Gent-R strains exhibited growth and adhesion to antibiotic-loaded specimens similar to controls (plain discs). Only the VRSA strain (Staphylococcus aureus 5/7) and Escherichia coli were able to grow and adhere to vancomycin-loaded specimens after 24 h of incubation. The specimens loaded with the gentamicin + vancomycin combination showed a synergistic inhibitory effect against all tested strains (no bacterial growth). The degree of bacterial adhesion to PMMA cement loaded with gentamicin or vancomycin may be reduced in spite of a normal growth rate and is different for the tested strains. The effect of gentamicin and vancomycin on bacterial growth and adhesion to PMMA bone cement depends on the antibiotic concentrations, on the characteristics of each specific strain and on its ability to produce biofilm and adhere to antibiotic-loaded PMMA bone cement.
Bacterial adhesion; Biofilms; Gentamicins; Vancomycin; Polymethyl Methacrylate; Staphylococcus; Streptococcus
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/411536
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