Objective: To illustrate how patients introduce cues and concerns during clinical consultations and how psychiatrists respond to them. Method: Sixteen psychiatrists recorded 104 first diagnostic consultations, coded with the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES). Cues, concerns and responses were analyzed in relation to patient gender and ICD-10 diagnosis, and psychiatrists’ age, gender, clinical experience and consultation process. Results: Cues were more frequent among female patients and were equally distributed among diagnostic categories. Concerns were more frequent among patients with ‘‘Mood’’ or ‘‘Neurotic’’ disorders. Psychiatrists’ responses to cues tended to ‘‘provide space’’ without being explicit. Referral to the affective part was restricted to concerns which had been solicited by the psychiatrist. Empathic responses were infrequent. Cues and concerns received more attention by female psychiatrists. Conclusion: The study confirms gender differences in expressing and dealing with emotions both by patients and psychiatrists. Females tend to give more space to this topic. Psychiatrists ‘responses differed according to cues, concerns, gender, diagnosis and to who prompted the cue/concern, showing a preference for topics introduced by the themselves. Practice implications: The VR-CoDES is a useful tool to define the strategies psychiatrists adopt when handling patients’ emotions in terms of cues and concern.

How emotions emerge and are dealt with in first diagnostic consultations in psychiatry.

DEL PICCOLO, Lidia;MAZZI, Maria Angela;GOSS, Claudia;RIMONDINI, Michela;ZIMMERMANN, Christa
2012

Abstract

Objective: To illustrate how patients introduce cues and concerns during clinical consultations and how psychiatrists respond to them. Method: Sixteen psychiatrists recorded 104 first diagnostic consultations, coded with the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES). Cues, concerns and responses were analyzed in relation to patient gender and ICD-10 diagnosis, and psychiatrists’ age, gender, clinical experience and consultation process. Results: Cues were more frequent among female patients and were equally distributed among diagnostic categories. Concerns were more frequent among patients with ‘‘Mood’’ or ‘‘Neurotic’’ disorders. Psychiatrists’ responses to cues tended to ‘‘provide space’’ without being explicit. Referral to the affective part was restricted to concerns which had been solicited by the psychiatrist. Empathic responses were infrequent. Cues and concerns received more attention by female psychiatrists. Conclusion: The study confirms gender differences in expressing and dealing with emotions both by patients and psychiatrists. Females tend to give more space to this topic. Psychiatrists ‘responses differed according to cues, concerns, gender, diagnosis and to who prompted the cue/concern, showing a preference for topics introduced by the themselves. Practice implications: The VR-CoDES is a useful tool to define the strategies psychiatrists adopt when handling patients’ emotions in terms of cues and concern.
Psychiatry Communication Communication skills Cue Concern VR-CoDES Sequence analysis
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/392104
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