Limb ataxia of sudden onset is due to a vascular lesion in either the cerebellum or the brainstem (posterior circulation, PC, territory). This sign can involve both the upper and the lower limb (hemiataxia) or only one limb (monoataxia). The topographical correlates of limb ataxia have been studied only in brainstem strokes. Therefore, it is not yet known whether this sign is useful to localize the lesion within the entire cerebellar system, both the cerebellar hemisphere and the cerebellar brainstem pathways. Limb ataxia was semi-quantified according to the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale in 92 consecutive patients with acute PC stroke. Limb ataxia was present in 70 patients. Four topographical patterns based on magnetic resonance imaging findings were identified: picaCH pattern (posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct); scaCH pattern (superior cerebellar artery infarct); CH/CP pattern (infarct involving both the cerebellum and the brainstem cerebellar pathways); and CP pattern (infarct involving the brainstem cerebellar pathways). Hemiataxia was present in (47/70; 67.1%) and monoataxia in (23/70; 32.9%) of patients. Monoataxia involved the upper limb in (19/70; 27.1%) and the lower limb in (4/70; 5.7%) of patients. Limb ataxia usually localized the lesion ipsilaterally (picaCH, scaCH, CH/CP, and CP patterns involving the medulla and sometimes the pons) (53/70; 75.7%), but it might be due also to contralateral (CP pattern involving the pons or midbrain) (16/70; 22.9%) or bilateral lesions (1/70). Limb ataxia usually localizes the lesion ipsilaterally but the infarct might be sometimes contralateral. The occurrence of monoataxia may suggest that the cerebellar system is somatotopically organized.

Hemi- and monoataxia in cerebellar hemispheres and peduncles stroke lesions: topographical correlations.

DELUCA, Cristina;MORETTO, Giuseppe;DI MATTEO, Alessandro;CAPPELLARI, Manuel;FIASCHI, Antonio;TINAZZI, Michele;
2012

Abstract

Limb ataxia of sudden onset is due to a vascular lesion in either the cerebellum or the brainstem (posterior circulation, PC, territory). This sign can involve both the upper and the lower limb (hemiataxia) or only one limb (monoataxia). The topographical correlates of limb ataxia have been studied only in brainstem strokes. Therefore, it is not yet known whether this sign is useful to localize the lesion within the entire cerebellar system, both the cerebellar hemisphere and the cerebellar brainstem pathways. Limb ataxia was semi-quantified according to the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale in 92 consecutive patients with acute PC stroke. Limb ataxia was present in 70 patients. Four topographical patterns based on magnetic resonance imaging findings were identified: picaCH pattern (posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarct); scaCH pattern (superior cerebellar artery infarct); CH/CP pattern (infarct involving both the cerebellum and the brainstem cerebellar pathways); and CP pattern (infarct involving the brainstem cerebellar pathways). Hemiataxia was present in (47/70; 67.1%) and monoataxia in (23/70; 32.9%) of patients. Monoataxia involved the upper limb in (19/70; 27.1%) and the lower limb in (4/70; 5.7%) of patients. Limb ataxia usually localized the lesion ipsilaterally (picaCH, scaCH, CH/CP, and CP patterns involving the medulla and sometimes the pons) (53/70; 75.7%), but it might be due also to contralateral (CP pattern involving the pons or midbrain) (16/70; 22.9%) or bilateral lesions (1/70). Limb ataxia usually localizes the lesion ipsilaterally but the infarct might be sometimes contralateral. The occurrence of monoataxia may suggest that the cerebellar system is somatotopically organized.
cerebellum; Cerebellar peduncles; stroke; hemiataxia; monoataxia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/390435
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