Different results have been reported for skiing and snowboarding injuries worldwide. Few studies consider the injury severity score (ISS) for the evaluation of differences among injured skiers-snowboarders. The aim of this study is to identify possible risk factors that affect the severity of skiing and snowboarding injuries in three winter seasons (2002-2005) in South Tyrol. For every injured skier or snowboarder referred to our emergency department in three consecutive seasons, the following data were collected: date of birth, gender, self-declared technical skills level, place of residence (local/non-local), as well as the date, time, and place of the accident. Type of injury and ISS were retrospectively assigned. Data concerning the snowfall in the last 24 h, average snow level, and outdoor air temperature values were obtained from four weather stations that were located inside the ski resorts. A multiple linear regression model was used to evaluate the association between ISS and potential determinants. In the analyzed seasons, 2,511 injured skiers and 843 injured snowboarders were evaluated at our emergency department. There was a significant change in the ISS value for subjects with different self-reported skills levels (P < 0.001). Men and non-local residents experienced more severe injuries than women and local residents, respectively (P < 0.013, P < 0.001). The ISS was higher for people aged over 60 (P < 0.001). Snowfalls brought about a decrease in accident severity (P = 0.009). The severity of the injuries increases with age. Prevention and information programs should be targeted to people who are at high risk of severe injury. A 24-h fresh snowfall seems to reduce the severity of injuries. Very little is known about snow conditions and winter sports injury. Further studies are needed to explore this field.

Factors affecting injury severity among recreational skiers and snowboarders: an epidemiology study.

GIRARDI, Paolo;
2010

Abstract

Different results have been reported for skiing and snowboarding injuries worldwide. Few studies consider the injury severity score (ISS) for the evaluation of differences among injured skiers-snowboarders. The aim of this study is to identify possible risk factors that affect the severity of skiing and snowboarding injuries in three winter seasons (2002-2005) in South Tyrol. For every injured skier or snowboarder referred to our emergency department in three consecutive seasons, the following data were collected: date of birth, gender, self-declared technical skills level, place of residence (local/non-local), as well as the date, time, and place of the accident. Type of injury and ISS were retrospectively assigned. Data concerning the snowfall in the last 24 h, average snow level, and outdoor air temperature values were obtained from four weather stations that were located inside the ski resorts. A multiple linear regression model was used to evaluate the association between ISS and potential determinants. In the analyzed seasons, 2,511 injured skiers and 843 injured snowboarders were evaluated at our emergency department. There was a significant change in the ISS value for subjects with different self-reported skills levels (P < 0.001). Men and non-local residents experienced more severe injuries than women and local residents, respectively (P < 0.013, P < 0.001). The ISS was higher for people aged over 60 (P < 0.001). Snowfalls brought about a decrease in accident severity (P = 0.009). The severity of the injuries increases with age. Prevention and information programs should be targeted to people who are at high risk of severe injury. A 24-h fresh snowfall seems to reduce the severity of injuries. Very little is known about snow conditions and winter sports injury. Further studies are needed to explore this field.
winter sport; injuries; epidemiology
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/388698
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