It has been hypothesized that exhaled breath temperature (EBT) is related to the degree of airway inflammation/remodeling in asthma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the level of airway response to exercise and EBT in a group of controlled or partly controlled asthmatic children. Fifty asthmatic children underwent measurements of EBT before and after a standardized exercise test. EBT was 32.92 ± 1.13 and 33.35 ± 0.95°C before and after exercise, respectively (P < 0.001). The % decrease in FEV(1) was significantly correlated with the increase in EBT (r = 0.44, P = 0.0013), being r = 0.49 (P < 0.005) in the children who were not receiving regular inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and 0.37 (n.s.) in those who were. This study further supports the hypothesis that EBT can be considered a potential composite tool for monitoring asthma.

Exhaled breath temperature and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children

Peroni, Diego;CHINELLATO, Iolanda;PIAZZA, Michele;BODINI, Alessandro;Olivieri, Francesca;BONER, Attilio;PIACENTINI, Giorgio
2012

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that exhaled breath temperature (EBT) is related to the degree of airway inflammation/remodeling in asthma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the level of airway response to exercise and EBT in a group of controlled or partly controlled asthmatic children. Fifty asthmatic children underwent measurements of EBT before and after a standardized exercise test. EBT was 32.92 ± 1.13 and 33.35 ± 0.95°C before and after exercise, respectively (P < 0.001). The % decrease in FEV(1) was significantly correlated with the increase in EBT (r = 0.44, P = 0.0013), being r = 0.49 (P < 0.005) in the children who were not receiving regular inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and 0.37 (n.s.) in those who were. This study further supports the hypothesis that EBT can be considered a potential composite tool for monitoring asthma.
* exhaled breath temperature; * exercise-induced bronchoconstriction; * asthma
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/364112
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