OBJECTIVES:Studies have shown the importance of vascular risk factors in the pathogenesis and evolution of cognitive disorders and dementia especially among the very elderly. The aim of the present longitudinal 1-year cohort analysis was to evaluate the influence of arterial stiffness on cognitive decline in institutionalized subjects older than 80 years.DESIGN:Longitudinal study.SETTING:Nursing homes in France and Italy.PARTICIPANTS:A total of 873 subjects (79% women), aged 87 ± 5 years were included in this longitudinal analysis from the PARTAGE cohort.MEASUREMENTS:All completed the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) on the 2 visits over 1 year and underwent a measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), an indicator of aortic stiffness. Clinical and 3-day self-measurements of blood pressure (BP) and activities of daily living (ADL) were evaluated at baseline visit.RESULTS:According to PWV tertiles and after adjustment for baseline MMSE, mean BP (MBP), age, education level, and ADL, Δ MMSE was -1.42 ± 3.60 in the first tertile, -1.78 ± 4.08 in the second tertile, and -2.20 ± 3.98 in the third tertile (P < .03). Similar analyses with self-measured MBP failed to show any association between BP on MMSE decline.CONCLUSION:This 1-year longitudinal study in institutionalized patients older than 80 years shows that the higher the aortic stiffness, the more pronounced the decline in cognitive function. These results point out the interest of measuring PWV, a simple noninvasive and validated method for arterial stiffness assessment, to detect high-risk patients for cognitive decline.

Pulse Wave Velocity is Associated With 1-Year Cognitive Decline in the Elderly Older than 80 Years: the PARTAGE Study.

FANTIN, Francesco;ZAMBONI, Mauro
2012-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:Studies have shown the importance of vascular risk factors in the pathogenesis and evolution of cognitive disorders and dementia especially among the very elderly. The aim of the present longitudinal 1-year cohort analysis was to evaluate the influence of arterial stiffness on cognitive decline in institutionalized subjects older than 80 years.DESIGN:Longitudinal study.SETTING:Nursing homes in France and Italy.PARTICIPANTS:A total of 873 subjects (79% women), aged 87 ± 5 years were included in this longitudinal analysis from the PARTAGE cohort.MEASUREMENTS:All completed the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) on the 2 visits over 1 year and underwent a measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), an indicator of aortic stiffness. Clinical and 3-day self-measurements of blood pressure (BP) and activities of daily living (ADL) were evaluated at baseline visit.RESULTS:According to PWV tertiles and after adjustment for baseline MMSE, mean BP (MBP), age, education level, and ADL, Δ MMSE was -1.42 ± 3.60 in the first tertile, -1.78 ± 4.08 in the second tertile, and -2.20 ± 3.98 in the third tertile (P < .03). Similar analyses with self-measured MBP failed to show any association between BP on MMSE decline.CONCLUSION:This 1-year longitudinal study in institutionalized patients older than 80 years shows that the higher the aortic stiffness, the more pronounced the decline in cognitive function. These results point out the interest of measuring PWV, a simple noninvasive and validated method for arterial stiffness assessment, to detect high-risk patients for cognitive decline.
2012
hypertension; elderly; cognitive decline
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/353803
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 18
  • Scopus 57
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 50
social impact