OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether robot-assisted gait training combined with transcranial direct current stimulation is more effective than robot-assisted gait training alone or conventional walking rehabilitation for improving walking ability in stroke patients. DESIGN: Pilot randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Rehabilitation unit of a university hospital. SUBJECTS: Thirty patients with chronic stroke. INTERVENTIONS: All patients received ten 50-minute treatment sessions, five days a week, for two consecutive weeks. Group 1 (n = 10) underwent a robot-assisted gait training combined with transcranial direct current stimulation; group 2 (n = 10) underwent a robot-assisted gait training combined with sham transcranial direct current stimulation; group 3 (n = 10) performed overground walking exercises. MAIN MEASURES: Patients were evaluated before, immediately after and two weeks post treatment. Primary outcomes: six-minute walking test, 10-m walking test. RESULTS: No differences were found between groups 1 and 2 for all primary outcome measures at the after treatment and follow-up evaluations. A statistically significant improvement was found after treatment in performance on the six-minute walking test and the 10-m walking test in favour of group 1 (six-minute walking test: 205.20 ± 61.16 m; 10-m walking test: 16.20 ± 7.65 s) and group 2 (six-minute walking test: 182.5 ± 69.30 m; 10-m walking test: 17.71 ± 8.20 s) compared with group 3 (six-minute walking test: 116.30 ± 75.40 m; 10-m walking test: 26.30 ± 14.10 s). All improvements were maintained at the follow-up evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: In the present pilot study transcranial direct current stimulation had no additional effect on robot-assisted gait training in patients with chronic stroke. Larger studies are required to confirm these preliminary findings.

Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and robot-assisted gait training in patients with chronic stroke: a preliminary comparison.

GEROIN, Christian;PICELLI, Alessandro;MUNARI, Daniele;SMANIA, Nicola
2011

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether robot-assisted gait training combined with transcranial direct current stimulation is more effective than robot-assisted gait training alone or conventional walking rehabilitation for improving walking ability in stroke patients. DESIGN: Pilot randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Rehabilitation unit of a university hospital. SUBJECTS: Thirty patients with chronic stroke. INTERVENTIONS: All patients received ten 50-minute treatment sessions, five days a week, for two consecutive weeks. Group 1 (n = 10) underwent a robot-assisted gait training combined with transcranial direct current stimulation; group 2 (n = 10) underwent a robot-assisted gait training combined with sham transcranial direct current stimulation; group 3 (n = 10) performed overground walking exercises. MAIN MEASURES: Patients were evaluated before, immediately after and two weeks post treatment. Primary outcomes: six-minute walking test, 10-m walking test. RESULTS: No differences were found between groups 1 and 2 for all primary outcome measures at the after treatment and follow-up evaluations. A statistically significant improvement was found after treatment in performance on the six-minute walking test and the 10-m walking test in favour of group 1 (six-minute walking test: 205.20 ± 61.16 m; 10-m walking test: 16.20 ± 7.65 s) and group 2 (six-minute walking test: 182.5 ± 69.30 m; 10-m walking test: 17.71 ± 8.20 s) compared with group 3 (six-minute walking test: 116.30 ± 75.40 m; 10-m walking test: 26.30 ± 14.10 s). All improvements were maintained at the follow-up evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: In the present pilot study transcranial direct current stimulation had no additional effect on robot-assisted gait training in patients with chronic stroke. Larger studies are required to confirm these preliminary findings.
transcranial direct current stimulation; robot-assisted gait training; chronic stroke patients; rehabilitation; clinical trial
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/349232
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 33
  • Scopus 93
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 89
social impact