AIM:Clinical diagnosis of appendicitis in children is often difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound with graded compressed technique in cases with suspected appendicitis.METHODS:A radiological classification of appendicitis was formulated associated with the surgical/histological degree. Afterwards, 92 patients with suspected appendicitis enrolled in this study were prospectively evaluated and managed to follow a new protocol based on the clinical and radiological experiences. In this study, the ultrasonography was considered positive when the diameter of the wall of the appendix was larger than 7 mm and vascularization was increased or absent.RESULTS:Of these 92 patients, 54 patients underwent surgery while 38 were treated conservatively. Of the treated group, 12 patients had a perforated appendicitis, 3 had a gangrenous appendicitis, 36 patients demonstrated a phlegmonous appendix while 3 patients had a catarrhal appendix. Blood cell counts and CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with appendicitis (P<0.05) and WBC and CRP levels were higher for patients with perforated appendicitis compared with patients with simple appendicitis (P<0.05). A CRP value higher than 17 mg/dL was a strong predictor for the presence of infection. Three patients of the conservative group underwent surgery later for recurrent abdominal pain (within 2 weeks); two had a catarrhal appendix while one patient had a normal appendix (confirmed by histology)CONCLUSIONS:Patients with suspected appendicitis could be managed with ultrasound, suggesting an early approach. The selection of patients for surgery prevent complication and unnecessary surgery.

Correlation between high-resolution ultrasound and surgical/pathological findings in patients with suspected appendicitis

ZAMPIERI, Nicola;CORROPPOLO, Michele;EL DALATI, GHASSAN;GIACOMELLO, Luca;CAMOGLIO, Francesco Saverio
2008

Abstract

AIM:Clinical diagnosis of appendicitis in children is often difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound with graded compressed technique in cases with suspected appendicitis.METHODS:A radiological classification of appendicitis was formulated associated with the surgical/histological degree. Afterwards, 92 patients with suspected appendicitis enrolled in this study were prospectively evaluated and managed to follow a new protocol based on the clinical and radiological experiences. In this study, the ultrasonography was considered positive when the diameter of the wall of the appendix was larger than 7 mm and vascularization was increased or absent.RESULTS:Of these 92 patients, 54 patients underwent surgery while 38 were treated conservatively. Of the treated group, 12 patients had a perforated appendicitis, 3 had a gangrenous appendicitis, 36 patients demonstrated a phlegmonous appendix while 3 patients had a catarrhal appendix. Blood cell counts and CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with appendicitis (P<0.05) and WBC and CRP levels were higher for patients with perforated appendicitis compared with patients with simple appendicitis (P<0.05). A CRP value higher than 17 mg/dL was a strong predictor for the presence of infection. Three patients of the conservative group underwent surgery later for recurrent abdominal pain (within 2 weeks); two had a catarrhal appendix while one patient had a normal appendix (confirmed by histology)CONCLUSIONS:Patients with suspected appendicitis could be managed with ultrasound, suggesting an early approach. The selection of patients for surgery prevent complication and unnecessary surgery.
Appendicitis; Ultrasound; Child; Appendix
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/327365
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