Prolonged venous stasis, as generated by a long tourniquet placement, produces spurious variations in several measurable analytes. To verify to what extent venous stasis influences routine hematologic testing, we assessed routine hematologic parameters, including hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count (RBC), main cell hemoglobin (MHC), main cell volume (MCV), platelet count (PLT), main platelet volume (MPV), white blood cell count (WBC) and WBC differential on the Advia 120 automated hematology analyzer in 30 healthy volunteers, either without venous stasis (no stasis) or after application of a 60 mmHg standardized external pressure by a sphygmomanometer, for 1 (1-min stasis) and 3 min (3-min stasis). Although the overall correlation between measures was globally acceptable, the mean values for paired samples were significantly different in all parameters tested, except MCV, MHC, PLT, MPV, eosinophils, basophils and large unstained cells after 1-min stasis and all parameters except MCV, MHC, MPV and basophils after 3-min venous stasis. As expected RBC, hemoglobin and hematocrit displayed a significant trend towards increase, whereas WBC and the WBC subpopulations were decreased. Difference between measurements by Bland and Altman plots exceeded the current analytical quality specifications for desirable bias for WBC, RBC, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lymphocytes and monocytes in samples collected after either 1- and 3-min stasis. These results provide clear evidence that venous stasis during venipuncture might produce spurious and clinically meaningful biases in the measurement of several hematologic parameters, prompting further considerations on the usefulness of adopting appropriate preventive measures for minimizing such influences. © 2006 The Authors.

Venous stasis and routine hematologic testing.

LIPPI, Giuseppe;SALVAGNO, GIAN LUCA;MONTAGNANA, Martina;GUIDI, Giancesare
2006

Abstract

Prolonged venous stasis, as generated by a long tourniquet placement, produces spurious variations in several measurable analytes. To verify to what extent venous stasis influences routine hematologic testing, we assessed routine hematologic parameters, including hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count (RBC), main cell hemoglobin (MHC), main cell volume (MCV), platelet count (PLT), main platelet volume (MPV), white blood cell count (WBC) and WBC differential on the Advia 120 automated hematology analyzer in 30 healthy volunteers, either without venous stasis (no stasis) or after application of a 60 mmHg standardized external pressure by a sphygmomanometer, for 1 (1-min stasis) and 3 min (3-min stasis). Although the overall correlation between measures was globally acceptable, the mean values for paired samples were significantly different in all parameters tested, except MCV, MHC, PLT, MPV, eosinophils, basophils and large unstained cells after 1-min stasis and all parameters except MCV, MHC, MPV and basophils after 3-min venous stasis. As expected RBC, hemoglobin and hematocrit displayed a significant trend towards increase, whereas WBC and the WBC subpopulations were decreased. Difference between measurements by Bland and Altman plots exceeded the current analytical quality specifications for desirable bias for WBC, RBC, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lymphocytes and monocytes in samples collected after either 1- and 3-min stasis. These results provide clear evidence that venous stasis during venipuncture might produce spurious and clinically meaningful biases in the measurement of several hematologic parameters, prompting further considerations on the usefulness of adopting appropriate preventive measures for minimizing such influences. © 2006 The Authors.
Hematologic analyzer; Hematologic testing; Hemoglobin; Preanalytic variability; Tourniquet; Venous stasis;
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/32400
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